Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Southern Jazz Musicians

Southern Jazz Musicians Top Ten B y c h a r l e s J oy ne r The cornetist, trumpeter, vocalist, composer, and bandleader Louis Armstrong (here) synthesized the contributions of the New Orleans pioneers, but his own chops--his tone, his range, his speed, and his creative solos--were like nothing jazz had known before. Photograph courtesy of the New York World Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection at the Library of Congress. Selecting the top ten southern jazz musicians proved to be a more difficult task than I expected. Some of the choices are obvious, others perhaps less so. Had I used other criteria, some selections might well have been different. But when I chose to base my list on their significance to the historical development of jazz, many brilliantly talented musicians and personal favorites did not make the cut. Except for the top two places, which would have been the same in any case, I have arranged my selections by chronology rather than by their popularity or my critical assessment. Numbers eight through ten are great New Orleans pioneers. It is difficult to imagine what jazz would have become without them. Reeling off feathery arpeggios with his right http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Southern Jazz Musicians

Southern Cultures , Volume 15 (3) – Aug 13, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/southern-jazz-musicians-EfuK41QqiS
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Top Ten B y c h a r l e s J oy ne r The cornetist, trumpeter, vocalist, composer, and bandleader Louis Armstrong (here) synthesized the contributions of the New Orleans pioneers, but his own chops--his tone, his range, his speed, and his creative solos--were like nothing jazz had known before. Photograph courtesy of the New York World Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection at the Library of Congress. Selecting the top ten southern jazz musicians proved to be a more difficult task than I expected. Some of the choices are obvious, others perhaps less so. Had I used other criteria, some selections might well have been different. But when I chose to base my list on their significance to the historical development of jazz, many brilliantly talented musicians and personal favorites did not make the cut. Except for the top two places, which would have been the same in any case, I have arranged my selections by chronology rather than by their popularity or my critical assessment. Numbers eight through ten are great New Orleans pioneers. It is difficult to imagine what jazz would have become without them. Reeling off feathery arpeggios with his right

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 13, 2009

There are no references for this article.