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Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology (review)

Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology (review) david grimsted, professor of history emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, is continuing his study of American mobs during 1828–61 with a volume dealing with economically oriented riots that explores the ties and tensions in the nation’s vibrant democracy and capitalism. Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology. Edited by M. Thomas Inge and Ed Piacentino. (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2010. Pp. 360. Paper, $26.95.) Between 1830 and 1860, a diverse group of southern humorists pro- duced a catalog of tall tales, satires, spoofs, and reminiscences that still ranks as the Old South’s major literary contribution. “Serious” writers such as William Gilmore Simms always labored in the shadow of Cooper or Hawthorne, but the amateur humorists had no equal. The tradition began with Augustus B. Longstreet’s Georgia Scenes in 1834 and persisted in George Washington Harris’s wildly anarchic Sut Lovingood. Clustered around these classics were many more, some well known and some not. The writers drew their characters from all strata of southern society, put them in uncomfortable and often ludicrous situations, and let them speak in their own words. Twain picked up the tradition in Huckleberry Finn, Faulkner developed it in Spotted Horses, and Andy Griffi th http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

david grimsted, professor of history emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, is continuing his study of American mobs during 1828–61 with a volume dealing with economically oriented riots that explores the ties and tensions in the nation’s vibrant democracy and capitalism. Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology. Edited by M. Thomas Inge and Ed Piacentino. (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2010. Pp. 360. Paper, $26.95.) Between 1830 and 1860, a diverse group of southern humorists pro- duced a catalog of tall tales, satires, spoofs, and reminiscences that still ranks as the Old South’s major literary contribution. “Serious” writers such as William Gilmore Simms always labored in the shadow of Cooper or Hawthorne, but the amateur humorists had no equal. The tradition began with Augustus B. Longstreet’s Georgia Scenes in 1834 and persisted in George Washington Harris’s wildly anarchic Sut Lovingood. Clustered around these classics were many more, some well known and some not. The writers drew their characters from all strata of southern society, put them in uncomfortable and often ludicrous situations, and let them speak in their own words. Twain picked up the tradition in Huckleberry Finn, Faulkner developed it in Spotted Horses, and Andy Griffi th

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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