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South/South, South/North Conversations: South Africa, India, the West

South/South, South/North Conversations: South Africa, India, the West South/South, South/North Conversations: South Africa, India, the West Michael Chapman The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 5-16 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0024 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414732/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COMPAKATLST SOUTH/SOUTH, SOUTH/NORTH CONVERSATIONS: SOUTH AFRICA, INDIA, THE WEST Michael Chapman The new century might have suggested new possibilities for comparative study. The end of the Cold War, the symbolic end of racism in the demise of apartheid, the potential of information-age communication, taken to- gether, could have been conducive to comparison as a mode of construct- ing, enlarging, and enriching the cultural life. Instead of flexible inter- changes, however, millennial reactions often remind us of Charles Bern- heimer's observation that comparison is "anxiogenic," or too frequently productive of anxiety (1, 2). Certainly it was the competitive model of the comparative enterprise that prevailed in the heated exchange that followed Salman Rushdie's remarks in a special fiction issue of The New Yorker that appeared in 1997. The issue, "India Focus," marked the fiftieth anniversary of Indian independence and provoked the comment by Rushdie that Indian litera- ture in English represents perhaps http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

South/South, South/North Conversations: South Africa, India, the West

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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1559-0887

Abstract

South/South, South/North Conversations: South Africa, India, the West Michael Chapman The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 5-16 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0024 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414732/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COMPAKATLST SOUTH/SOUTH, SOUTH/NORTH CONVERSATIONS: SOUTH AFRICA, INDIA, THE WEST Michael Chapman The new century might have suggested new possibilities for comparative study. The end of the Cold War, the symbolic end of racism in the demise of apartheid, the potential of information-age communication, taken to- gether, could have been conducive to comparison as a mode of construct- ing, enlarging, and enriching the cultural life. Instead of flexible inter- changes, however, millennial reactions often remind us of Charles Bern- heimer's observation that comparison is "anxiogenic," or too frequently productive of anxiety (1, 2). Certainly it was the competitive model of the comparative enterprise that prevailed in the heated exchange that followed Salman Rushdie's remarks in a special fiction issue of The New Yorker that appeared in 1997. The issue, "India Focus," marked the fiftieth anniversary of Indian independence and provoked the comment by Rushdie that Indian litera- ture in English represents perhaps

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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