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“So, then people do come here in order to live”: Interiority in the Novels of Rainer Maria Rilke and Scipio Slataper

“So, then people do come here in order to live”: Interiority in the Novels of Rainer Maria... Sa Skia e lizabeth z iolkow Ski “So, then people do come here in order to live” Interiority in the Novels of Rainer Maria Rilke and Scipio Slataper For many, Trieste is better known as the temporary home of the Irish immigrant whom Ezra Pound once referred to as a “refugee from Trieste,”1 than for the numer- ous modern Italian authors who lived there. e Th n fi al words ofU lysses, “Trieste- Zürich-Paris,” not only catalogue the three cities in which James Joyce worked on his masterpiece, but also emblematize the way scholars tend to place Italian and German-language literature, in an itinerary that ultimately leads to Paris, as the presumptive capital of modernist culture. Trieste, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until its fall, can, however, also be seen as the geographic and intellectual passage between the German-speaking world, particularly Austria-Hungary, and Italy.2 An Austro-Italian rather than a Franco-Italian or Euro-Italian perspective highlights elements of Italian modernism that remain underexplored. Italian modernism has been less examined than most other national European modernisms and, perhaps because it is chronologically and geographically diffuse, critics tend to concentrate on individual authors, such as Gabriele D’Annunzio, Italo Svevo, Carlo Emilio Gadda, Luigi http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

“So, then people do come here in order to live”: Interiority in the Novels of Rainer Maria Rilke and Scipio Slataper

The Comparatist , Volume 33 – Jun 12, 2009

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Sa Skia e lizabeth z iolkow Ski “So, then people do come here in order to live” Interiority in the Novels of Rainer Maria Rilke and Scipio Slataper For many, Trieste is better known as the temporary home of the Irish immigrant whom Ezra Pound once referred to as a “refugee from Trieste,”1 than for the numer- ous modern Italian authors who lived there. e Th n fi al words ofU lysses, “Trieste- Zürich-Paris,” not only catalogue the three cities in which James Joyce worked on his masterpiece, but also emblematize the way scholars tend to place Italian and German-language literature, in an itinerary that ultimately leads to Paris, as the presumptive capital of modernist culture. Trieste, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until its fall, can, however, also be seen as the geographic and intellectual passage between the German-speaking world, particularly Austria-Hungary, and Italy.2 An Austro-Italian rather than a Franco-Italian or Euro-Italian perspective highlights elements of Italian modernism that remain underexplored. Italian modernism has been less examined than most other national European modernisms and, perhaps because it is chronologically and geographically diffuse, critics tend to concentrate on individual authors, such as Gabriele D’Annunzio, Italo Svevo, Carlo Emilio Gadda, Luigi

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 12, 2009

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