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So Conceived and So Dedicated: Intellectual Life in the Civil War–Era North ed. by Lorien Foote and Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai (review)

So Conceived and So Dedicated: Intellectual Life in the Civil War–Era North ed. by Lorien Foote... other historians, such as Matthew Salafia and Adam Arenson, contend that commonalities united the region--and that a third, western, region did indeed exist in the antebellum period. In contrast, for example, Stanley Harrold argues in Border War: Fighting over Slavery before the Civil War (2010) that the antebellum Upper South and Lower North were "distinct societies" divided by the institution of slavery. Finally, Phillips engages with a third conundrum: when, how, and why the slave states that remained in the Union came to identify as southern and Confederate. Phillips identifies emancipation--combined with internal conflict and military intervention--as the catalyst that turned white middle border residents from proslavery Unionists or neutrals to Confederate sympathizers. Thus the antebellum consensus among white westerners was replaced by regional politics, turning postwar Kentucky and Missouri into southern states. Some limitations are to be expected in a book of such extensive geographic and chronological breadth. Because Phillips is focused on finding commonalities across the region, abolitionists, Republicans, and Unionists can feel at times like perpetual outsiders. Likewise, a focus on native-born white residents means African Americans and immigrants remain more peripheral to the narrative. Finally, because the most violent conflict, political upheaval, and social http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

So Conceived and So Dedicated: Intellectual Life in the Civil War–Era North ed. by Lorien Foote and Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (1) – Jan 26, 2017

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

other historians, such as Matthew Salafia and Adam Arenson, contend that commonalities united the region--and that a third, western, region did indeed exist in the antebellum period. In contrast, for example, Stanley Harrold argues in Border War: Fighting over Slavery before the Civil War (2010) that the antebellum Upper South and Lower North were "distinct societies" divided by the institution of slavery. Finally, Phillips engages with a third conundrum: when, how, and why the slave states that remained in the Union came to identify as southern and Confederate. Phillips identifies emancipation--combined with internal conflict and military intervention--as the catalyst that turned white middle border residents from proslavery Unionists or neutrals to Confederate sympathizers. Thus the antebellum consensus among white westerners was replaced by regional politics, turning postwar Kentucky and Missouri into southern states. Some limitations are to be expected in a book of such extensive geographic and chronological breadth. Because Phillips is focused on finding commonalities across the region, abolitionists, Republicans, and Unionists can feel at times like perpetual outsiders. Likewise, a focus on native-born white residents means African Americans and immigrants remain more peripheral to the narrative. Finally, because the most violent conflict, political upheaval, and social

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 26, 2017

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