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Shellburne Thurber's Southern Home

Shellburne Thurber's Southern Home essay ...................... by Lee Zacharias As the titles of many of these images suggest, Shellburne Thurber's photographic series "Home" is best viewed in full color. To view these photographs in that format, visit the Southern Cultures web site: www.SouthernCultures.org. n the summer of 1936, when Walker Evans traveled with James Agee to Hale County, Alabama, to document the daily lives of tenant cotton farmers for Fortune, he established in the mind of America a lasting image of the South. Though the essay never appeared in the magazine, which found Agee's writing "pessimistic, unconstructive, indignant, lyrical, and always personal," the photographs were included in Walker Evans: American Photographs, published in 1938 by the Museum of Modern Art in conjunction with its first one-photographer retrospective.1 They also were reissued in 1941 with Agee's text as Let Us Now Praise Famous Men but belonged to Evans's employer, the Farm Security Administration (fsa), as a condition of his leave, and thus passed into the public domain. If Evans's portraits of the Alabama sharecroppers and their families stand with Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California" as icons of the Depression, his interiors of their houses, those of the West Virginia coal miners he http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Shellburne Thurber's Southern Home

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (3)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

essay ...................... by Lee Zacharias As the titles of many of these images suggest, Shellburne Thurber's photographic series "Home" is best viewed in full color. To view these photographs in that format, visit the Southern Cultures web site: www.SouthernCultures.org. n the summer of 1936, when Walker Evans traveled with James Agee to Hale County, Alabama, to document the daily lives of tenant cotton farmers for Fortune, he established in the mind of America a lasting image of the South. Though the essay never appeared in the magazine, which found Agee's writing "pessimistic, unconstructive, indignant, lyrical, and always personal," the photographs were included in Walker Evans: American Photographs, published in 1938 by the Museum of Modern Art in conjunction with its first one-photographer retrospective.1 They also were reissued in 1941 with Agee's text as Let Us Now Praise Famous Men but belonged to Evans's employer, the Farm Security Administration (fsa), as a condition of his leave, and thus passed into the public domain. If Evans's portraits of the Alabama sharecroppers and their families stand with Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California" as icons of the Depression, his interiors of their houses, those of the West Virginia coal miners he

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

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