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Seeing the Light: Cultural and Social Capital Productions in an Inner-city High School

Seeing the Light: Cultural and Social Capital Productions in an Inner-city High School Youth advocates employed in a school-to-work program in an inner-city public high school promoted the college attainments of low-income Black students through the production of cultural and social capital. Analysis framed by cultural reproduction and production theories explicate how they inverted the ideological aims of the program; redefined their roles as "surrogate" middle-class parents; generated cultural productions through reality therapy; and created useful links to social resources and networks. Youth advocates changed the educational trajectory of some students. But there were other students who used cultural and social capital in productions that kept them closely tied to their families, neighborhoods, and local workplaces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Seeing the Light: Cultural and Social Capital Productions in an Inner-city High School

The High School Journal , Volume 90 (3) – Mar 20, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

Youth advocates employed in a school-to-work program in an inner-city public high school promoted the college attainments of low-income Black students through the production of cultural and social capital. Analysis framed by cultural reproduction and production theories explicate how they inverted the ideological aims of the program; redefined their roles as "surrogate" middle-class parents; generated cultural productions through reality therapy; and created useful links to social resources and networks. Youth advocates changed the educational trajectory of some students. But there were other students who used cultural and social capital in productions that kept them closely tied to their families, neighborhoods, and local workplaces.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 20, 2007

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