Schooling the New South Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (review)

Schooling the New South Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (review) Schooling the New South Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880--1920 By James L. Leloudis University of North Carolina Press, 1 996 338 pp. Cloth, $39.95 Reviewed by Richard Barry Westin, professor of history at the University of Richmond. The last decade has seen die historiography of public education in the South begin to come of age. James Leloudis's Schooling the New South now takes it place along with the works of William Link and James Anderson as part of a major revisionist trend away from the early histories of southern education that presented pictures of unalloyed progress. Schooling the New South may be the best work yet in revealing the complexities of the transformation between 1880 and 1920 from one-room common schools to the modern graded school system. One factor that makes it such an outstanding work is the balance it achieves. Leloudis avoids a simple dualism between school reformers and their opponents and, for the most part, chooses the approach of historian Herbert Butterfield to mentally walk along with those of the past he is writing about in order to convey why they took the actions they did. Leloudis uses the movement in 1 8 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Schooling the New South Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920 (review)

Southern Cultures, Volume 3 (3) – Jan 4, 1997

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Schooling the New South Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880--1920 By James L. Leloudis University of North Carolina Press, 1 996 338 pp. Cloth, $39.95 Reviewed by Richard Barry Westin, professor of history at the University of Richmond. The last decade has seen die historiography of public education in the South begin to come of age. James Leloudis's Schooling the New South now takes it place along with the works of William Link and James Anderson as part of a major revisionist trend away from the early histories of southern education that presented pictures of unalloyed progress. Schooling the New South may be the best work yet in revealing the complexities of the transformation between 1880 and 1920 from one-room common schools to the modern graded school system. One factor that makes it such an outstanding work is the balance it achieves. Leloudis avoids a simple dualism between school reformers and their opponents and, for the most part, chooses the approach of historian Herbert Butterfield to mentally walk along with those of the past he is writing about in order to convey why they took the actions they did. Leloudis uses the movement in 1 8

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1997

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