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Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama by Sarah L. Hyde (review)

Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana,... an important challenge to find value in our own historical research, and a welcome innovation in the history of slavery and capitalism. Alexandra J. Finley alexandra j. finley, assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University, is the author of “‘Cash to Corinna’: Domestic Labor and Sexual Economy in the ‘Fancy Trade,’” Journal of American History 104, no. 2 (September 2017). Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. By Sarah L. Hyde. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2016. Pp. 240. Cloth, $42.50.) Sarah Hyde’s Schooling in the Antebellum South is a refreshing interven- tion in the understanding of public education across the antebellum Gulf South states. Previous scholarship has often misconstrued a lack of pre- collegiate institutions in those states as an absence of learning and a sign that white southerners did not place cultural value on education. By exam- ining Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama, Hyde reveals that formal and informal learning was common in the region. White southerners utilized a range of private and public options, and their popular support of educa- tion prompted the statewide implementation of public schools before the Civil War. Over six chapters, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama by Sarah L. Hyde (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 6, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

an important challenge to find value in our own historical research, and a welcome innovation in the history of slavery and capitalism. Alexandra J. Finley alexandra j. finley, assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University, is the author of “‘Cash to Corinna’: Domestic Labor and Sexual Economy in the ‘Fancy Trade,’” Journal of American History 104, no. 2 (September 2017). Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. By Sarah L. Hyde. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2016. Pp. 240. Cloth, $42.50.) Sarah Hyde’s Schooling in the Antebellum South is a refreshing interven- tion in the understanding of public education across the antebellum Gulf South states. Previous scholarship has often misconstrued a lack of pre- collegiate institutions in those states as an absence of learning and a sign that white southerners did not place cultural value on education. By exam- ining Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama, Hyde reveals that formal and informal learning was common in the region. White southerners utilized a range of private and public options, and their popular support of educa- tion prompted the statewide implementation of public schools before the Civil War. Over six chapters,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2018

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