Sartoris Resartus

Sartoris Resartus Charles Joyner The South is an enigma, secret and sacred. It is easy enough to say that it is a promised land, that the central theme of its history is a common resolve, indomitably maintained, that the South has been and shall remain the world the slaveholders made, not so much because of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of its past nor because of the defeat and tragedy and guilt and poverty and blood and irony which have been the burden of its history (white over black and black over white) nor because of its intimacy and power, its arrogance and pride and satiety and knowledge of anguish and foreknowledge of death (Oh lost! And by the wind grieved! But I believe we shall be found); 348Southern Cultures and not because yesterday won't be over until tomorrow and tomorrow is another day (You can't understand it. You would have to be born there); nor even because of the immoderate verbiage of Southern prose, the message in the bottle, the baroque and involuted effluvium of words no sober man would make and no sane man http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Sartoris Resartus

Southern Cultures, Volume 1 (3) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Charles Joyner The South is an enigma, secret and sacred. It is easy enough to say that it is a promised land, that the central theme of its history is a common resolve, indomitably maintained, that the South has been and shall remain the world the slaveholders made, not so much because of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of its past nor because of the defeat and tragedy and guilt and poverty and blood and irony which have been the burden of its history (white over black and black over white) nor because of its intimacy and power, its arrogance and pride and satiety and knowledge of anguish and foreknowledge of death (Oh lost! And by the wind grieved! But I believe we shall be found); 348Southern Cultures and not because yesterday won't be over until tomorrow and tomorrow is another day (You can't understand it. You would have to be born there); nor even because of the immoderate verbiage of Southern prose, the message in the bottle, the baroque and involuted effluvium of words no sober man would make and no sane man

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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