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Round Towns

Round Towns H ow ard A. S chretter Institute of Community and A rea Development University of Georgia The N ature o f M unicipal Lim its: There are some seventeen thousand localities: in the U nited States which have met the legal requirem ents of their respective states for m unicipal status and have form ally incorporated for m ore effective regulations of their local and internal affairs. Although the requirem ents for incorporation vary from state to state and between the several ranks of m unicipalities, there exists an unequivocal requisite for all places seeking m unicipal charters. "All m unicipal incorporations m ust have legally prescribed boundaries," . . . and, "These boundaries m ust be fixed, definite and certain in order th at they m ay be identified, and that all may know the exact scope, selection of territory or geographic division embraced w ithin the cor porate limits. . . Only thirteen states have further refined these general requirem ents for boundaries by prescribing total area lim itations, and only two of these, by actually specifying shapes. In both Kentucky and New Mexico long standing statutes call for the assumption of rectangular limits by newly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeastern Geographer University of North Carolina Press

Round Towns

Southeastern Geographer , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 29, 1963

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Southeastern Division, Association of American Geographers.
ISSN
1549-6929
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

H ow ard A. S chretter Institute of Community and A rea Development University of Georgia The N ature o f M unicipal Lim its: There are some seventeen thousand localities: in the U nited States which have met the legal requirem ents of their respective states for m unicipal status and have form ally incorporated for m ore effective regulations of their local and internal affairs. Although the requirem ents for incorporation vary from state to state and between the several ranks of m unicipalities, there exists an unequivocal requisite for all places seeking m unicipal charters. "All m unicipal incorporations m ust have legally prescribed boundaries," . . . and, "These boundaries m ust be fixed, definite and certain in order th at they m ay be identified, and that all may know the exact scope, selection of territory or geographic division embraced w ithin the cor porate limits. . . Only thirteen states have further refined these general requirem ents for boundaries by prescribing total area lim itations, and only two of these, by actually specifying shapes. In both Kentucky and New Mexico long standing statutes call for the assumption of rectangular limits by newly

Journal

Southeastern GeographerUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 29, 1963

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