Rose’s War and the Gendered Politics of a Slave Insurgency in the Civil War

Rose’s War and the Gendered Politics of a Slave Insurgency in the Civil War thavolia glymph One window . . . was opened Heavenwards . . . for three million slaves, across the blackness of a civil war. --Eliza Woolsey The conduct of our scouts should be no child's play. --Henry William Ravenel We have two kinds of enemies to contend with our negro outlaws & the Yankees. --Georgianna DeVeaux Porcher "I suppose before this you have heard that the scouts had been to P.V. [Pineville] killed 27 of the armed negroes and shot Rose so I need say nothing more about that."1 Indeed, Anne Gaillard said nothing more about Rose in this letter to her daughter. She wrote at length, however, as she had in a previous letter, about the lingering effects of the slave insurgency that had precipitated the battle between the scouts and the "armed negroes" on March 26, 1865. Rose, she dismissed summarily. She was "shot." Enough said. References to Rose in the historical record tend, like Gaillard's, to be brief, matter-of-fact. From the distance of a historian's sight, it might simply appear that the very idea of a slave-woman rebel was simply too much to bear for the white people who wrote about Rose. But the crisp, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Rose’s War and the Gendered Politics of a Slave Insurgency in the Civil War

The Journal of the Civil War Era, Volume 3 (4) – Nov 16, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

thavolia glymph One window . . . was opened Heavenwards . . . for three million slaves, across the blackness of a civil war. --Eliza Woolsey The conduct of our scouts should be no child's play. --Henry William Ravenel We have two kinds of enemies to contend with our negro outlaws & the Yankees. --Georgianna DeVeaux Porcher "I suppose before this you have heard that the scouts had been to P.V. [Pineville] killed 27 of the armed negroes and shot Rose so I need say nothing more about that."1 Indeed, Anne Gaillard said nothing more about Rose in this letter to her daughter. She wrote at length, however, as she had in a previous letter, about the lingering effects of the slave insurgency that had precipitated the battle between the scouts and the "armed negroes" on March 26, 1865. Rose, she dismissed summarily. She was "shot." Enough said. References to Rose in the historical record tend, like Gaillard's, to be brief, matter-of-fact. From the distance of a historian's sight, it might simply appear that the very idea of a slave-woman rebel was simply too much to bear for the white people who wrote about Rose. But the crisp,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 16, 2013

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