Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Romantic Reformers and the Antislavery Struggle in the Civil War Era by Ethan J. Kytle (review)

Romantic Reformers and the Antislavery Struggle in the Civil War Era by Ethan J. Kytle (review) The threat that such family crises could pose to a professional and political career built on exemplary black achievement is clear from Greenspan's revealing account of the intramural surveillance to which a rival abolitionist faction subjected Brown. But here and elsewhere, the style of this rigorous, yet always highly readable, biography seems to conflict with its substance. For instance, glossing the "strange[ness]" of Brown's public exchange with William Seward, New York's antislavery ex-governor, Greenspan asks, "Why was a dedicated employee of the American Anti-Slavery Society--which uncompromisingly opposed all organized political activity as a debased and ineffective means of ending slavery--lobbying a prominent politician for the restoration of black suffrage in New York?" (138). Between the two em dashes is compressed the highly influential (and equally controversial) philosophy behind William Lloyd Garrison's strand of abolitionism. Rather than an overview of the central controversies within abolitionism-- moral suasion versus political tactics, gradualism versus immediatism, nonviolent resistance versus direct action, and the concurrent debates over the place of women and African Americans in movement leadership--the reader is often introduced to such core issues through incidental, even cryptic asides. Greenspan's account will give scholars a new appreciation for the deftness with which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Romantic Reformers and the Antislavery Struggle in the Civil War Era by Ethan J. Kytle (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/romantic-reformers-and-the-antislavery-struggle-in-the-civil-war-era-TOk6VteU95
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The threat that such family crises could pose to a professional and political career built on exemplary black achievement is clear from Greenspan's revealing account of the intramural surveillance to which a rival abolitionist faction subjected Brown. But here and elsewhere, the style of this rigorous, yet always highly readable, biography seems to conflict with its substance. For instance, glossing the "strange[ness]" of Brown's public exchange with William Seward, New York's antislavery ex-governor, Greenspan asks, "Why was a dedicated employee of the American Anti-Slavery Society--which uncompromisingly opposed all organized political activity as a debased and ineffective means of ending slavery--lobbying a prominent politician for the restoration of black suffrage in New York?" (138). Between the two em dashes is compressed the highly influential (and equally controversial) philosophy behind William Lloyd Garrison's strand of abolitionism. Rather than an overview of the central controversies within abolitionism-- moral suasion versus political tactics, gradualism versus immediatism, nonviolent resistance versus direct action, and the concurrent debates over the place of women and African Americans in movement leadership--the reader is often introduced to such core issues through incidental, even cryptic asides. Greenspan's account will give scholars a new appreciation for the deftness with which

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 21, 2015

There are no references for this article.