Revolutionary War Invalid Pensions and the Bureaucratic Language of Disability in the Early Republic

Revolutionary War Invalid Pensions and the Bureaucratic Language of Disability in the Early Republic laurel daen William and Mary In 1792, Thaddeus Beebe, a private in the First Regiment of Connecticut Continental Troops, applied to the District Court of Connecticut for an invalid pension. In 1776, just over one month after the ratification of the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress had passed an act entitling soldiers who were disabled in the line of duty to half pay for the duration of their disability (Ford 5: 702­05). Hoping to take advantage of recent legislation that had renewed this act (An Act to Provide for the Settlement), Beebe presented his case before the court. Richard Douglass, the second lieutenant in Beebe's regiment, testified that "in the year 1777 Beebe was Agreeably to an Order of Congress Inoculated for the Small Pox by which he lost the Sight of his Right Eye & was Otherwise so Debilitated" (Record Book). Joshua Raymond, a tax collector in Beebe's hometown of New London, added that "his Constitution [was] so broken down in my opinion that he has never recovered it since" (Record Book). After hearing Beebe's case, presiding judges James Iredell and Richard Law assessed him as one-quarter disabled, according to the legal stipulation that veterans who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Revolutionary War Invalid Pensions and the Bureaucratic Language of Disability in the Early Republic

Early American Literature, Volume 52 (1) – Mar 18, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/revolutionary-war-invalid-pensions-and-the-bureaucratic-language-of-0Lcjz1qhuK
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

laurel daen William and Mary In 1792, Thaddeus Beebe, a private in the First Regiment of Connecticut Continental Troops, applied to the District Court of Connecticut for an invalid pension. In 1776, just over one month after the ratification of the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress had passed an act entitling soldiers who were disabled in the line of duty to half pay for the duration of their disability (Ford 5: 702­05). Hoping to take advantage of recent legislation that had renewed this act (An Act to Provide for the Settlement), Beebe presented his case before the court. Richard Douglass, the second lieutenant in Beebe's regiment, testified that "in the year 1777 Beebe was Agreeably to an Order of Congress Inoculated for the Small Pox by which he lost the Sight of his Right Eye & was Otherwise so Debilitated" (Record Book). Joshua Raymond, a tax collector in Beebe's hometown of New London, added that "his Constitution [was] so broken down in my opinion that he has never recovered it since" (Record Book). After hearing Beebe's case, presiding judges James Iredell and Richard Law assessed him as one-quarter disabled, according to the legal stipulation that veterans who

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 18, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off