Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

"Return and Get It": Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory

"Return and Get It": Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory Essay .................... “ ​ Return and Get It” Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory by Brian Graves At first glance, the site appears to have the usual trappings of other plantation tourist destinations in the region: a Spanish moss–draped oak alley leading to the antebellum “big house,” guided tours that wind through a rustic landscape dotted with plantation outbuildings, interpretive signs, and a gift shop. Photograph courtesy of the author.   n April 25th, 2015, the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission (CCPRC) officially opened the McLeod Plantation Historic Site (MPHS) on James Island, South Carolina. At first glance, the site appears to have the usual trappings of other plantation tourist destinations in the region: a Spanish moss–­draped oak alley leading to the antebellum “big house,” guided tours that wind through a rustic landscape dotted with plantation outbuildings, interpretive signs, and a gift shop. Yet there is an important distinction between McLeod and its contemporaries: under the ownership and management of the CCPRC, McLeod has become the first public plantation site in the Charleston region that is primarily dedicated to preserving and interpreting African American history. Within its public history program, “The Transition to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"Return and Get It": Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (2) – Jul 20, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/return-and-get-it-developing-mcleod-plantation-as-a-shared-space-of-pE0bhYIeTO
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Essay .................... “ ​ Return and Get It” Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory by Brian Graves At first glance, the site appears to have the usual trappings of other plantation tourist destinations in the region: a Spanish moss–draped oak alley leading to the antebellum “big house,” guided tours that wind through a rustic landscape dotted with plantation outbuildings, interpretive signs, and a gift shop. Photograph courtesy of the author.   n April 25th, 2015, the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission (CCPRC) officially opened the McLeod Plantation Historic Site (MPHS) on James Island, South Carolina. At first glance, the site appears to have the usual trappings of other plantation tourist destinations in the region: a Spanish moss–­draped oak alley leading to the antebellum “big house,” guided tours that wind through a rustic landscape dotted with plantation outbuildings, interpretive signs, and a gift shop. Yet there is an important distinction between McLeod and its contemporaries: under the ownership and management of the CCPRC, McLeod has become the first public plantation site in the Charleston region that is primarily dedicated to preserving and interpreting African American history. Within its public history program, “The Transition to

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

There are no references for this article.