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Replacement Rebels: Confederate Substitution and the Issue of Citizenship

Replacement Rebels: Confederate Substitution and the Issue of Citizenship <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article sheds new light on the Confederacy’s policy of military substitution. This policy, which allowed those eligible for conscription to provide a substitute who was not eligible in their place, has typically been construed through the lens of loyalty. The author seeks to move beyond this paradigm by contemplating the ways in which substitution fit with contemporary southern attitudes surrounding citizenship and its inherent duties. As the article contends, substitution became a discarded policy not simply because it caused class discontent, was subject to abuse, or was an impediment to the Confederacy’s pressing military manpower needs; it was discarded because it also grew to be increasingly incompatible with Confederate understandings of manhood and citizenship.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Replacement Rebels: Confederate Substitution and the Issue of Citizenship

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 6, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article sheds new light on the Confederacy’s policy of military substitution. This policy, which allowed those eligible for conscription to provide a substitute who was not eligible in their place, has typically been construed through the lens of loyalty. The author seeks to move beyond this paradigm by contemplating the ways in which substitution fit with contemporary southern attitudes surrounding citizenship and its inherent duties. As the article contends, substitution became a discarded policy not simply because it caused class discontent, was subject to abuse, or was an impediment to the Confederacy’s pressing military manpower needs; it was discarded because it also grew to be increasingly incompatible with Confederate understandings of manhood and citizenship.</p>

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2018

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