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Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence by Boyd Cothran (review)

Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence by Boyd... American “exceptionalism” had promised during better days. The new col- lective sensory experience surely caused people to rethink not only their human relationships and even humanity but also their belief systems. The postwar effects of the smell of battle, the taste of siege, and all other sen - sory experience on religion, society, and culture now beg for analysis in the studies that must come from Smith’s call for a sensory history of the war and the age. Oh that we would listen to that command. Randall M. Miller randall m. miller is the William Dirk Warren ‘50 Sesquicentennial Chair and Professor of History at Saint Joseph’s University. Among his recent books is Lincoln and Leadership: Military, Political, and Religious Decision Making (Fordham University Press, 2012). Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence. By Boyd Cothran. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 264. Cloth, $34.95.) Using colonial violence and settler colonialism as organizing concepts, Boyd Cothran’s case study of the Modoc tribe argues more broadly that Euro-Americans shaped their historical memory of the Indian wars in a manner that portrayed a mythological narrative of American innocence. In a six-chapter analysis of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence by Boyd Cothran (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

American “exceptionalism” had promised during better days. The new col- lective sensory experience surely caused people to rethink not only their human relationships and even humanity but also their belief systems. The postwar effects of the smell of battle, the taste of siege, and all other sen - sory experience on religion, society, and culture now beg for analysis in the studies that must come from Smith’s call for a sensory history of the war and the age. Oh that we would listen to that command. Randall M. Miller randall m. miller is the William Dirk Warren ‘50 Sesquicentennial Chair and Professor of History at Saint Joseph’s University. Among his recent books is Lincoln and Leadership: Military, Political, and Religious Decision Making (Fordham University Press, 2012). Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence. By Boyd Cothran. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014. Pp. 264. Cloth, $34.95.) Using colonial violence and settler colonialism as organizing concepts, Boyd Cothran’s case study of the Modoc tribe argues more broadly that Euro-Americans shaped their historical memory of the Indian wars in a manner that portrayed a mythological narrative of American innocence. In a six-chapter analysis of

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 21, 2015

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