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Remembering Reconstruction: Struggles over the Meaning of America’s Most Turbulent Era ed. by Carole Emberton and Bruce E. Baker (review)

Remembering Reconstruction: Struggles over the Meaning of America’s Most Turbulent Era ed. by... Authority in America, 1859–1877 [1990] appears nowhere in the volume). More broadly, this organizational structure prevents the volume from directly addressing the implications of categorical and methodological choices for defining the era. How is a history of Reconstruction defined as “politics” different from one that focuses on “emancipation and race,” in an era in which the central political question concerned the legacies of emancipation? Why does the concept of citizenship derive from scholar- ship on cultural and intellectual history, as this volume situates it, rather than from politics—and how do we separate citizenship from those central components of identity, gender and labor, or those concerns in turn from politics? Most important, what are the consequences of those choices for how we see the Reconstruction era and, by extension, how we interpret the history of the nation? It is these questions that a historiography of Reconstruction should prime both novice and veteran scholars to engage. Yet Interpreting American History: Reconstruction struggles to place its contents into direct conversation, which ultimately limits its value as a guide to the field. David C. Williard notes 1. Laura F. Edwards, “Reconstruction and the History of Governance,” in The World the Civil War Made, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Remembering Reconstruction: Struggles over the Meaning of America’s Most Turbulent Era ed. by Carole Emberton and Bruce E. Baker (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 6, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Authority in America, 1859–1877 [1990] appears nowhere in the volume). More broadly, this organizational structure prevents the volume from directly addressing the implications of categorical and methodological choices for defining the era. How is a history of Reconstruction defined as “politics” different from one that focuses on “emancipation and race,” in an era in which the central political question concerned the legacies of emancipation? Why does the concept of citizenship derive from scholar- ship on cultural and intellectual history, as this volume situates it, rather than from politics—and how do we separate citizenship from those central components of identity, gender and labor, or those concerns in turn from politics? Most important, what are the consequences of those choices for how we see the Reconstruction era and, by extension, how we interpret the history of the nation? It is these questions that a historiography of Reconstruction should prime both novice and veteran scholars to engage. Yet Interpreting American History: Reconstruction struggles to place its contents into direct conversation, which ultimately limits its value as a guide to the field. David C. Williard notes 1. Laura F. Edwards, “Reconstruction and the History of Governance,” in The World the Civil War Made,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2018

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