Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Remaining Relevant after Communism: The Role of the Writer in Eastern Europe (review)

Remaining Relevant after Communism: The Role of the Writer in Eastern Europe (review) his uncle, the illegitimate son of a common grandfather, an immigrant from Bul- garia. As the novel changes course to focus on Sebastian Chrest-Jones’s mysterious disappearance, the novel’s r fi st story line recedes into the background for several chapters. But the two plots reconnect toward the end thanks to Fa Chang, Chrest- Jones’s lover, and to her twin brother Xiao Chang. Murder in Byzantiu mig m ht disappoint the real aci fi onados of detective c fi tion, at least those who like their thrillers light and simple. Kristeva’s novel is anything but that. Part academic novel, part psychoanalytical treaty on childhood scars, part historical novel on the Crusades, part travel narrative, part political essay on the state of the world today, part philosophical meditation on identity, this is a rich and complex work. If Murder in Byzantiu mam nages to retain a unity of purpose in spite of its apparent eclecticism, it is primarily because it is a book by Kristeva on Kristeva, the most autobiographical of her novels, according to an interview she gave to the newspaper Le Monde. Direct autobiographical references abound in the novel: “Julia Kristeva” makes several appearances as a character; Stéphanie Delacour http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Remaining Relevant after Communism: The Role of the Writer in Eastern Europe (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/remaining-relevant-after-communism-the-role-of-the-writer-in-eastern-HrDuM7ChuI
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

his uncle, the illegitimate son of a common grandfather, an immigrant from Bul- garia. As the novel changes course to focus on Sebastian Chrest-Jones’s mysterious disappearance, the novel’s r fi st story line recedes into the background for several chapters. But the two plots reconnect toward the end thanks to Fa Chang, Chrest- Jones’s lover, and to her twin brother Xiao Chang. Murder in Byzantiu mig m ht disappoint the real aci fi onados of detective c fi tion, at least those who like their thrillers light and simple. Kristeva’s novel is anything but that. Part academic novel, part psychoanalytical treaty on childhood scars, part historical novel on the Crusades, part travel narrative, part political essay on the state of the world today, part philosophical meditation on identity, this is a rich and complex work. If Murder in Byzantiu mam nages to retain a unity of purpose in spite of its apparent eclecticism, it is primarily because it is a book by Kristeva on Kristeva, the most autobiographical of her novels, according to an interview she gave to the newspaper Le Monde. Direct autobiographical references abound in the novel: “Julia Kristeva” makes several appearances as a character; Stéphanie Delacour

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

There are no references for this article.