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Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861 (review)

Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861 (review) wholly supplanting the narrative of honor and mastery, Brothers of a Vow necessarily complicates that picture of southern sectional identity and its manly manifestations. James Hill Welborn III james hill welborn iii studies the cultural history of honor, religion, and manhood in the nineteenth-century South at the University of Georgia. Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861. By Kenneth W. Noe. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 336. Cloth, $35.00.) Kenneth W. Noe's Reluctant Rebels examines the wartime experiences of 180,000 Confederate soldiers who "resisted the siren call of glory in 1861" only to enlist during the second, third, or fourth years of the Civil War (2). The book isolates the experiences of these "later-enlisting" Confederates from the mammoth volume of literature on soldier motivation. Noe argues that "later enlistees" did not share the same motivations as the initial enlistees, nor did they share the questionable values of the substitutes and the draftees who served during the war's later months. Although later-enlisting Confederates supported secession, they generally enlisted to avoid the shame of being drafted or for state bounties to help their families. Post-1861 volunteers seldom described ideological convictions, instead affirming their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861 (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (2) – May 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

wholly supplanting the narrative of honor and mastery, Brothers of a Vow necessarily complicates that picture of southern sectional identity and its manly manifestations. James Hill Welborn III james hill welborn iii studies the cultural history of honor, religion, and manhood in the nineteenth-century South at the University of Georgia. Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861. By Kenneth W. Noe. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 336. Cloth, $35.00.) Kenneth W. Noe's Reluctant Rebels examines the wartime experiences of 180,000 Confederate soldiers who "resisted the siren call of glory in 1861" only to enlist during the second, third, or fourth years of the Civil War (2). The book isolates the experiences of these "later-enlisting" Confederates from the mammoth volume of literature on soldier motivation. Noe argues that "later enlistees" did not share the same motivations as the initial enlistees, nor did they share the questionable values of the substitutes and the draftees who served during the war's later months. Although later-enlisting Confederates supported secession, they generally enlisted to avoid the shame of being drafted or for state bounties to help their families. Post-1861 volunteers seldom described ideological convictions, instead affirming their

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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