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Reginald Pecock and the Religious Education of the Laity in Fifteenth-Century England

Reginald Pecock and the Religious Education of the Laity in Fifteenth-Century England Reginald Pecock and the   Religious Education of the Laity   in  Fifteenth-Century England by Kirsty Campbell n  latemediev   al  England,  the  production  of  religious literature in     the  vernacular co   nstitutesa     massive  transferof     clergie—of  knowl- I edge   and  learning—fromth   e  clergy  to  the  laity.Vincen   t Gillespie  writes,“th   e fifteenth  centurywit   nessed  an extensive and  consistent pro   - cess  of  assimilationby     the  laityof     techniques and  materialsof     spiritual  advancement,  which  had  historically b een  the  preserve  of  the  clerical  and  monastic  orders.” Over  250  copies  of  the  Wycliffite  Bible,  mostly  in  fragments,  are  produced  during  this  period.  This  is  a  time  when,  as  Sarah  Beckwith  notes,  “the  mechanisms  for  the  transmission of  ‘the- ology’  were  expanding,  and  conventionally th   eological quest   ions,  or  questions  hithertorest   rictedto     a  clerical milieu,     were  being  dissemi- nated  beyond  the  clergy in  the  vernacularand ,    hence  understood and  received  in  different  ways.”  The  signific ance  and  the  extent  of  this  transmissionof     religious cultureare     witnessed  by  the  term  vernacular theology,  used   by  NicholasW   atsonto     characterize ambit   ious  works  like  Piers Plowman,  which  grapple  with  complicated questions  about  salva- tion,  divine  justice,and     http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

Reginald Pecock and the Religious Education of the Laity in Fifteenth-Century England

Studies in Philology , Volume 107 (1) – Jan 13, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383

Abstract

Reginald Pecock and the   Religious Education of the Laity   in  Fifteenth-Century England by Kirsty Campbell n  latemediev   al  England,  the  production  of  religious literature in     the  vernacular co   nstitutesa     massive  transferof     clergie—of  knowl- I edge   and  learning—fromth   e  clergy  to  the  laity.Vincen   t Gillespie  writes,“th   e fifteenth  centurywit   nessed  an extensive and  consistent pro   - cess  of  assimilationby     the  laityof     techniques and  materialsof     spiritual  advancement,  which  had  historically b een  the  preserve  of  the  clerical  and  monastic  orders.” Over  250  copies  of  the  Wycliffite  Bible,  mostly  in  fragments,  are  produced  during  this  period.  This  is  a  time  when,  as  Sarah  Beckwith  notes,  “the  mechanisms  for  the  transmission of  ‘the- ology’  were  expanding,  and  conventionally th   eological quest   ions,  or  questions  hithertorest   rictedto     a  clerical milieu,     were  being  dissemi- nated  beyond  the  clergy in  the  vernacularand ,    hence  understood and  received  in  different  ways.”  The  signific ance  and  the  extent  of  this  transmissionof     religious cultureare     witnessed  by  the  term  vernacular theology,  used   by  NicholasW   atsonto     characterize ambit   ious  works  like  Piers Plowman,  which  grapple  with  complicated questions  about  salva- tion,  divine  justice,and    

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 13, 2010

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