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Reframing Problems in Secondary Education: Alternative Perspectives, New Insights, and Possibilities for Action

Reframing Problems in Secondary Education: Alternative Perspectives, New Insights, and... Mark W. Ellis California State University, Fullerton Maria Grant California State University, Fullerton Laura Haniford University of New Mexico, Albuquerque There is little disagreement that secondary education in the United States can and must be improved, with much attention given to analyses of outcomes ranging from dropout rates to academic achievement to international measures of literacy (e.g., National Center for Education Statistics, 2005). The perspectives offered by the authors of the manuscripts in this guest edited issue of The High School Journal call into question the way in which problems in secondary education are defined or framed (Cuban, 2001). The Power of Reframing Larry Cuban (2001) considers a problem to be "a situation in which a gap exists between what is and what ought to be" (p. 4). Typically in the field of education, the gaps that are examined arise from fixed vantage points--in essence, the same perspectives that framed problems in education 30 or more years ago are still used today. Perhaps this explains why veteran teachers often dismiss the latest trends in education; why a teacher who has spent 25 years in the classroom might shrug her shoulders when hearing about the latest "best practice," seeing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Reframing Problems in Secondary Education: Alternative Perspectives, New Insights, and Possibilities for Action

The High School Journal , Volume 91 (1) – Oct 30, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The University of North Carolina Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mark W. Ellis California State University, Fullerton Maria Grant California State University, Fullerton Laura Haniford University of New Mexico, Albuquerque There is little disagreement that secondary education in the United States can and must be improved, with much attention given to analyses of outcomes ranging from dropout rates to academic achievement to international measures of literacy (e.g., National Center for Education Statistics, 2005). The perspectives offered by the authors of the manuscripts in this guest edited issue of The High School Journal call into question the way in which problems in secondary education are defined or framed (Cuban, 2001). The Power of Reframing Larry Cuban (2001) considers a problem to be "a situation in which a gap exists between what is and what ought to be" (p. 4). Typically in the field of education, the gaps that are examined arise from fixed vantage points--in essence, the same perspectives that framed problems in education 30 or more years ago are still used today. Perhaps this explains why veteran teachers often dismiss the latest trends in education; why a teacher who has spent 25 years in the classroom might shrug her shoulders when hearing about the latest "best practice," seeing

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 30, 2007

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