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Rednecks, White Socks, and Piña Coladas?: Country Music Ain't What It Used to Be . . . And It Really Never Was

Rednecks, White Socks, and Piña Coladas?: Country Music Ain't What It Used to Be . . . And It... ESSAY Rednecks,White Socks, and Pina Coladas? Country Music Ain't What It Used to Be . . . And It Really Never Was by James C. Cobb ust the other day, I read a lengthy piece suggesting that the Grand Ole Opry is about to fade away. Fans of "contemporary" country apparendy don't find Little Jimmy Dickens or Porter Waggoner terribly relevant, and the current chartbusters among the younger generation of artists are loathe to forgo the big bucks from lucrative road gigs for the paltry $500 or so that the Opry pays. Such news is certain to set offa new season of wailing and hand-wringing from those who fear the irnminent demise of so-caUed "traditional" country music. Before we get too lathered up, however, let me point out that we've heard aU this before. ActuaUy, every time Garth Brooks or one of his big-hatted buddies kicks off an- other over-hyped mega-tour or cuts a new cd, somebody teUs us that if ol' Hank were aUve today, he'd be spinning in his grave. Now, don't get me wrong. The more "old fashioned" or "down home" a coun- try song is, the better I Uke it. They simply don't come http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Rednecks, White Socks, and Piña Coladas?: Country Music Ain't What It Used to Be . . . And It Really Never Was

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (4) – Jan 4, 1999

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY Rednecks,White Socks, and Pina Coladas? Country Music Ain't What It Used to Be . . . And It Really Never Was by James C. Cobb ust the other day, I read a lengthy piece suggesting that the Grand Ole Opry is about to fade away. Fans of "contemporary" country apparendy don't find Little Jimmy Dickens or Porter Waggoner terribly relevant, and the current chartbusters among the younger generation of artists are loathe to forgo the big bucks from lucrative road gigs for the paltry $500 or so that the Opry pays. Such news is certain to set offa new season of wailing and hand-wringing from those who fear the irnminent demise of so-caUed "traditional" country music. Before we get too lathered up, however, let me point out that we've heard aU this before. ActuaUy, every time Garth Brooks or one of his big-hatted buddies kicks off an- other over-hyped mega-tour or cuts a new cd, somebody teUs us that if ol' Hank were aUve today, he'd be spinning in his grave. Now, don't get me wrong. The more "old fashioned" or "down home" a coun- try song is, the better I Uke it. They simply don't come

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

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