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Rebellious Passage: The “Creole” Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade by Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie (review)

Rebellious Passage: The “Creole” Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade by Jeffrey R.... for example) are inclusive in their analysis of the role of women in the various topics explored. Nevertheless, an essay devoted to a woman of color’s point of view regarding the issues of race and citizenship, mobil- ity, labor, or the public sphere would have rendered for the reader a more complete analysis of this era of emancipation and nation building. And although the editors claim that Africans in the Atlantic world developed “cultural and intellectual tools that allowed them to challenge white colo- nial and national authorities” (2), I wonder if perhaps African people did not already possess those tools before contact, and rather harnessed what political and social capacity they already possessed to navigate within and outside of the oppressive institutional constructs that they found them- selves facing. That said, I highly recommend this book for undergraduate and gradu- ate students who are looking to broaden the narrative of what life was like for people of color across the Atlantic world and how black people inserted themselves into the intellectual, political, social, and religious discourse of various nation-states, asserting their rights to be free. Kay Wright Lewis kay wright lewis is an assistant professor of history at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Rebellious Passage: The “Creole” Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade by Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

for example) are inclusive in their analysis of the role of women in the various topics explored. Nevertheless, an essay devoted to a woman of color’s point of view regarding the issues of race and citizenship, mobil- ity, labor, or the public sphere would have rendered for the reader a more complete analysis of this era of emancipation and nation building. And although the editors claim that Africans in the Atlantic world developed “cultural and intellectual tools that allowed them to challenge white colo- nial and national authorities” (2), I wonder if perhaps African people did not already possess those tools before contact, and rather harnessed what political and social capacity they already possessed to navigate within and outside of the oppressive institutional constructs that they found them- selves facing. That said, I highly recommend this book for undergraduate and gradu- ate students who are looking to broaden the narrative of what life was like for people of color across the Atlantic world and how black people inserted themselves into the intellectual, political, social, and religious discourse of various nation-states, asserting their rights to be free. Kay Wright Lewis kay wright lewis is an assistant professor of history at

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 1, 2020

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