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Real Native Genius: How an Ex-Slave and a White Mormon Became Famous Indians by Angela Pulley Hudson (review)

Real Native Genius: How an Ex-Slave and a White Mormon Became Famous Indians by Angela Pulley... According to Neem, "Political historians need to do a better job examining the actual capabilities of ordinary citizens to affect political outcomes" (247). Voting, according to Neem, does not necessarily indicate the ability to achieve political change or secure desired outcomes. And yet parties clearly mobilized voters to engage in political action. Neem concludes the volume by stating that parties still matter, but historians need to seek a greater understanding of how they enabled or disabled citizens to engage in self-government. Taken together, these essays make another important contribution to our understanding of political development and popular politics by illustrating the difficulty in defining "party" in the early republic. Politicians and citizens alike had divergent definitions of what constituted a party. Moreover, the word itself held different meanings for different observers. The insights in these essays, especially Bradburn's, should spur closer analysis of what constituted a party during the early nineteenth century. Christopher Childers christopher childers, an assistant professor of history at Benedictine College, is the author of The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics (2012). He is currently writing a book on the Webster-Hayne debate and its significance to politics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Real Native Genius: How an Ex-Slave and a White Mormon Became Famous Indians by Angela Pulley Hudson (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (3) – Aug 18, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

According to Neem, "Political historians need to do a better job examining the actual capabilities of ordinary citizens to affect political outcomes" (247). Voting, according to Neem, does not necessarily indicate the ability to achieve political change or secure desired outcomes. And yet parties clearly mobilized voters to engage in political action. Neem concludes the volume by stating that parties still matter, but historians need to seek a greater understanding of how they enabled or disabled citizens to engage in self-government. Taken together, these essays make another important contribution to our understanding of political development and popular politics by illustrating the difficulty in defining "party" in the early republic. Politicians and citizens alike had divergent definitions of what constituted a party. Moreover, the word itself held different meanings for different observers. The insights in these essays, especially Bradburn's, should spur closer analysis of what constituted a party during the early nineteenth century. Christopher Childers christopher childers, an assistant professor of history at Benedictine College, is the author of The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics (2012). He is currently writing a book on the Webster-Hayne debate and its significance to politics

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 18, 2016

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