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(Re)considering the Role Familismo Plays in Latina/o High School Students' College Choices

(Re)considering the Role Familismo Plays in Latina/o High School Students' College Choices This qualitative study examines the role <i>familismo</i> (Marín &amp; Marín, 1991) played in 20 Latina/o high school seniors&apos; college choices. <i>Familismo</i> is the tendency to hold the wants and needs of family in higher regard than one&apos;s own and has been considered a common trait of Latina/o families. Interviews with students and secondary school counselors revealed this trait may be a common value upheld by Latina/o families but is also a reflection of structural forces outside the family unit. Findings highlight ways students negotiated the options of attending a university close to home to benefit from familial support and/or financially contribute to the family; leaving the region for college in order to ensure a "better life" for themselves and their families; or compromising by beginning at a regional institution and later transferring to another university. High school personnel, and others assisting Latina/os with their college choices should consider such findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

(Re)considering the Role Familismo Plays in Latina/o High School Students&apos; College Choices

The High School Journal , Volume 97 (1) – Nov 14, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

This qualitative study examines the role <i>familismo</i> (Marín &amp; Marín, 1991) played in 20 Latina/o high school seniors&apos; college choices. <i>Familismo</i> is the tendency to hold the wants and needs of family in higher regard than one&apos;s own and has been considered a common trait of Latina/o families. Interviews with students and secondary school counselors revealed this trait may be a common value upheld by Latina/o families but is also a reflection of structural forces outside the family unit. Findings highlight ways students negotiated the options of attending a university close to home to benefit from familial support and/or financially contribute to the family; leaving the region for college in order to ensure a "better life" for themselves and their families; or compromising by beginning at a regional institution and later transferring to another university. High school personnel, and others assisting Latina/os with their college choices should consider such findings.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 14, 2013

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