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Racial Enfleshment and Transpacific Modalities of Relation

Racial Enfleshment and Transpacific Modalities of Relation Michelle O’Brien Racial Ene fl shment and Transpacic fi Modalities of Relation intrOductiOn: the Komagata maru and recOvering racial affiliatiOns acrOss the transpacific 2014 marked the 100-y ear anniversary of the voyage ofK t om he agata Mar, uwhich is memorialized today as a significant example of a Sn otui- th Asian violence in Canada. 376 British subjects—Sikhs, Muslims, and Hindus—attempted to journey to Canada at a time when the nation’s race- b ased exclusion laws, and the 1908 Continuous Journey provision in particular, allowed immigration officers to refuse the entry of Indians who did not come directly from India to Canada on a con- tinuous journey (Johnston 17). 1 Once the Komagata Mar r ueached Burrard Inlet off the coast of British Columbia, it was forbidden to dock, and its passengers were forcibly detained aboard the ship for two months under b li a va re bl le co y- nditions (Mawani, “Spectres” 370). The Komagata Maru’s journey not only exemplifies this era of ant A i-sian xenophobia and racial exclusion in Canada—it also marks an in- stance where the nation’s desire for a “white country” was directly confronted (9, Mongia 207). The ship’s charter, Gurdit Singh, intended http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Racial Enfleshment and Transpacific Modalities of Relation

The Comparatist , Volume 42 – Nov 19, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Michelle O’Brien Racial Ene fl shment and Transpacic fi Modalities of Relation intrOductiOn: the Komagata maru and recOvering racial affiliatiOns acrOss the transpacific 2014 marked the 100-y ear anniversary of the voyage ofK t om he agata Mar, uwhich is memorialized today as a significant example of a Sn otui- th Asian violence in Canada. 376 British subjects—Sikhs, Muslims, and Hindus—attempted to journey to Canada at a time when the nation’s race- b ased exclusion laws, and the 1908 Continuous Journey provision in particular, allowed immigration officers to refuse the entry of Indians who did not come directly from India to Canada on a con- tinuous journey (Johnston 17). 1 Once the Komagata Mar r ueached Burrard Inlet off the coast of British Columbia, it was forbidden to dock, and its passengers were forcibly detained aboard the ship for two months under b li a va re bl le co y- nditions (Mawani, “Spectres” 370). The Komagata Maru’s journey not only exemplifies this era of ant A i-sian xenophobia and racial exclusion in Canada—it also marks an in- stance where the nation’s desire for a “white country” was directly confronted (9, Mongia 207). The ship’s charter, Gurdit Singh, intended

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 19, 2018

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