Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (review)

Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (review) insurgent thought; instead, Galloway takes his place in a network of power that included many individuals, ideas, and practices. As a result of The Waterman's Song, our sense of coastal Carolina is changed, changed utterly. In depicting the African American maritime past, David Cecelski has uncovered a legacy that lives with us today--in the landscape itself and in the practices of contemporary maritime laborers. One skill that reflects a particular kind of resourcefulness, and which runs like a leitmotif through Cecelski's study, is the ability of African American watermen to read "the book of nature." For example, in his 1895 Recollections of Slavery, Allen Parker recalled, "[B]eing out of doors a great deal of time, and having no books . . . [we] learned many things from the book of nature, which were unknown to white people, notwithstanding their knowledge of books." In this case, Parker is referring to his ability to fish at night, a skill that may have been originally learned from native Algonquian fishermen many generations earlier. The intelligence and interpretive skills of black watermen like Parker are impressive in their own right. But there is also here a lesson that transcends the particular situation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (review)

Southern Cultures, Volume 8 (1) – Jan 2, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/race-and-reunion-the-civil-war-in-american-memory-review-nbsPimTsCv
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

insurgent thought; instead, Galloway takes his place in a network of power that included many individuals, ideas, and practices. As a result of The Waterman's Song, our sense of coastal Carolina is changed, changed utterly. In depicting the African American maritime past, David Cecelski has uncovered a legacy that lives with us today--in the landscape itself and in the practices of contemporary maritime laborers. One skill that reflects a particular kind of resourcefulness, and which runs like a leitmotif through Cecelski's study, is the ability of African American watermen to read "the book of nature." For example, in his 1895 Recollections of Slavery, Allen Parker recalled, "[B]eing out of doors a great deal of time, and having no books . . . [we] learned many things from the book of nature, which were unknown to white people, notwithstanding their knowledge of books." In this case, Parker is referring to his ability to fish at night, a skill that may have been originally learned from native Algonquian fishermen many generations earlier. The intelligence and interpretive skills of black watermen like Parker are impressive in their own right. But there is also here a lesson that transcends the particular situation

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 2, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off