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Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism by Joshua A. Lynn (review)

Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of... concerns were not reported by census marshals. In an endnote, he dis- cusses why he chose the three Gulf states that he did. Florida contained only 186 firms and was too sparsely settled; records for Louisiana were lost. Fortunately, he had a wealth of information for Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. It might have behooved him to include in chapter 1 how and why he chose the Gulf South states that he did. The real value of Frawley’s book is his use of the R. G. Dun credit reports. These documents, organized by county, contain a treasure trove of infor- mation about firms. Not only do the Dun records describe the manufac - turing entities the 1860 census missed, but they also provide commentary on the net worth of a firm and often discuss the work ethic and moral standing of the owners. One particularly trenchant entry for gunsmith J. Franklin Kerr of Hinds County, Mississippi, states that he was “not worth anything, not good, deserted from Rebel Army” (125). The Dun records shed remarkable light on the business practices, successes, and failures of manufacturing firms throughout the country. But they are especially valu - able for anyone exploring economic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism by Joshua A. Lynn (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (2) – Jun 1, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

concerns were not reported by census marshals. In an endnote, he dis- cusses why he chose the three Gulf states that he did. Florida contained only 186 firms and was too sparsely settled; records for Louisiana were lost. Fortunately, he had a wealth of information for Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. It might have behooved him to include in chapter 1 how and why he chose the Gulf South states that he did. The real value of Frawley’s book is his use of the R. G. Dun credit reports. These documents, organized by county, contain a treasure trove of infor- mation about firms. Not only do the Dun records describe the manufac - turing entities the 1860 census missed, but they also provide commentary on the net worth of a firm and often discuss the work ethic and moral standing of the owners. One particularly trenchant entry for gunsmith J. Franklin Kerr of Hinds County, Mississippi, states that he was “not worth anything, not good, deserted from Rebel Army” (125). The Dun records shed remarkable light on the business practices, successes, and failures of manufacturing firms throughout the country. But they are especially valu - able for anyone exploring economic

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 1, 2020

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