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Practicing Democracy: Popular Politics in the United States from the Constitution to the Civil War ed. by Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith (review)

Practicing Democracy: Popular Politics in the United States from the Constitution to the Civil... b o o k rev i ews Practicing Democracy: Popular Politics in the United States from the Constitution to the Civil War. Edited by Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015. Pp. 296. Cloth, $49.50.) In Practicing Democracy, editors Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith have collected a series of thoughtful essays that challenge the role of political parties in the early republic. In keeping with the "new new political history" as well as the movement to study politics beyond traditional institutional forms, the contributors question Walter Dean Burnham's tidy "party systems" schema in favor of a messier vision of political development that emphasizes local politics and the realm of political action beyond the two-party system. They also challenge our understanding of the meaning of political parties themselves. For the most part, the contributors have advanced a well-reasoned case for reassessing the role of popular politics in early American political history. The book follows the approach of recent political histories by challenging the traditional institutional approach and examining ways in which "less tangible elements of politics like culture, class, and ideology" influenced political development (281). As Kenneth Owen argues in his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Practicing Democracy: Popular Politics in the United States from the Constitution to the Civil War ed. by Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 6 (3) – Aug 18, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

b o o k rev i ews Practicing Democracy: Popular Politics in the United States from the Constitution to the Civil War. Edited by Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015. Pp. 296. Cloth, $49.50.) In Practicing Democracy, editors Daniel Peart and Adam I. P. Smith have collected a series of thoughtful essays that challenge the role of political parties in the early republic. In keeping with the "new new political history" as well as the movement to study politics beyond traditional institutional forms, the contributors question Walter Dean Burnham's tidy "party systems" schema in favor of a messier vision of political development that emphasizes local politics and the realm of political action beyond the two-party system. They also challenge our understanding of the meaning of political parties themselves. For the most part, the contributors have advanced a well-reasoned case for reassessing the role of popular politics in early American political history. The book follows the approach of recent political histories by challenging the traditional institutional approach and examining ways in which "less tangible elements of politics like culture, class, and ideology" influenced political development (281). As Kenneth Owen argues in his

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 18, 2016

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