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Practical Liberators: Union Officers in the Western Theater during the Civil War by Kristopher A. Teters (review)

Practical Liberators: Union Officers in the Western Theater during the Civil War by Kristopher A.... wife, Mary Stewart. Coincidentally, Pinckney had spent a night there on the way to the Battle of Haw’s Shop. In the prologue, Bellows declares her intention to “let Pinckney and Barquet speak for themselves” (8) and admits that she “developed too much empathy for [her] subjects” (9). “Perhaps too,” Bellows adds, “I have indulged in rather old-fashioned storytelling at the expense of more prob- ing analysis because I have so enjoyed my time with both of these men and their families and wanted to share the details of their lives lest they be lost” (9–10). Unfortunately, the book would have benefited from more histori - cal analysis when dealing with controversial topics. Bellows relied heavily on Pinckney’s memoirs, and for that reason the book is at times overly sympathetic to Pinckney’s cause, although not necessarily at the expense of Barquet. In particular, Bellows’s treatment of the Pinckney family’s slave- holding is troubling. Historians have moved well beyond treating slav- ery as a benign institution. Yet Bellows writes, “Deeply influenced by the precepts of Christian paternalism, one core conviction Tom maintained until the day he died was that his family had always been good masters to loyal slaves” (45). Missing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Practical Liberators: Union Officers in the Western Theater during the Civil War by Kristopher A. Teters (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (3) – Sep 3, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

wife, Mary Stewart. Coincidentally, Pinckney had spent a night there on the way to the Battle of Haw’s Shop. In the prologue, Bellows declares her intention to “let Pinckney and Barquet speak for themselves” (8) and admits that she “developed too much empathy for [her] subjects” (9). “Perhaps too,” Bellows adds, “I have indulged in rather old-fashioned storytelling at the expense of more prob- ing analysis because I have so enjoyed my time with both of these men and their families and wanted to share the details of their lives lest they be lost” (9–10). Unfortunately, the book would have benefited from more histori - cal analysis when dealing with controversial topics. Bellows relied heavily on Pinckney’s memoirs, and for that reason the book is at times overly sympathetic to Pinckney’s cause, although not necessarily at the expense of Barquet. In particular, Bellows’s treatment of the Pinckney family’s slave- holding is troubling. Historians have moved well beyond treating slav- ery as a benign institution. Yet Bellows writes, “Deeply influenced by the precepts of Christian paternalism, one core conviction Tom maintained until the day he died was that his family had always been good masters to loyal slaves” (45). Missing

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 3, 2019

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