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Postcolonial Thought in the French-Speaking World (review)

Postcolonial Thought in the French-Speaking World (review) Reviews Charles Forsdick and David Murphy, eds., Postcolonial Thought in the French- Speaking World Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2009 i Th s year on the 14th of July France celebrated the birth of the Republic together with fourteen other countries from Sub- Saharan Francophone Africa. Despite president Sarkozy’s ar ffi mation that the impressive multinational parade was not another nostalgic revival of France’s colonial glory, such a display of military power brought attention to the intricate ways in which the former Empire still over- shadows various practices of commemoration and institutionalized identity nar- ratives of the present- day Republic. e Th s pontaneous revolts of the young descendants of immigrant workers of Northern African and Sub- Saharan African origin in the French banlieue in N - o vember 2005, as well as the recent debate on national identity initiated in Nove- m ber 2009 by Eric Besson, minister of Immigration, Integration, National Identity and Co- development, equally demonstrated that the malaise of contemporary French society is deeply rooted in its colonial history and that the end of coloni- zation is far from being a precise punctual event from the past. Along these lines, in their introduction to Postcolonial o http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Postcolonial Thought in the French-Speaking World (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Reviews Charles Forsdick and David Murphy, eds., Postcolonial Thought in the French- Speaking World Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2009 i Th s year on the 14th of July France celebrated the birth of the Republic together with fourteen other countries from Sub- Saharan Francophone Africa. Despite president Sarkozy’s ar ffi mation that the impressive multinational parade was not another nostalgic revival of France’s colonial glory, such a display of military power brought attention to the intricate ways in which the former Empire still over- shadows various practices of commemoration and institutionalized identity nar- ratives of the present- day Republic. e Th s pontaneous revolts of the young descendants of immigrant workers of Northern African and Sub- Saharan African origin in the French banlieue in N - o vember 2005, as well as the recent debate on national identity initiated in Nove- m ber 2009 by Eric Besson, minister of Immigration, Integration, National Identity and Co- development, equally demonstrated that the malaise of contemporary French society is deeply rooted in its colonial history and that the end of coloni- zation is far from being a precise punctual event from the past. Along these lines, in their introduction to Postcolonial o

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

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