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Post-Cold War Narratives of Nostalgia

Post-Cold War Narratives of Nostalgia Claudia Sadowski-Smith The Comparatist, Volume 23, May 1999, pp. 117-127 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1999.0022 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415141/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:15 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHPAnATIST Claudia Sadowski-Smith There is more memory than remembrance. We do not reign over the past. It contains as many secrets as thefuture. Adam Zagajewski, "Der Verrat" iV Since the momentous changes of 1989 in Eastern Europe, developments in each of the former East Bloc countries have been uneven. Those countries situated at the greatest distance from the geopoUtical center of Europe—in the east and southeast—are also furthest removed from the goals of Western-style democracy and market economy. In countries like Bulgaria, Romania, and Serbia, which had initially started down what the West has labeled the "path of nostalgia," postcommunist rule is only now, in the late 1990s, declining. East Bloc countries closer to Europe's center—the former East Ger- many, Poland, Hungary, and the former Czechoslovakia—seem to have moved further in their Westernization efforts. But even this group is marked by major differences in the history of their transitions, in the makeup of the poUtical and business eUtes after http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Post-Cold War Narratives of Nostalgia

The Comparatist , Volume 23 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Claudia Sadowski-Smith The Comparatist, Volume 23, May 1999, pp. 117-127 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1999.0022 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415141/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:15 GMT from JHU Libraries ??? COHPAnATIST Claudia Sadowski-Smith There is more memory than remembrance. We do not reign over the past. It contains as many secrets as thefuture. Adam Zagajewski, "Der Verrat" iV Since the momentous changes of 1989 in Eastern Europe, developments in each of the former East Bloc countries have been uneven. Those countries situated at the greatest distance from the geopoUtical center of Europe—in the east and southeast—are also furthest removed from the goals of Western-style democracy and market economy. In countries like Bulgaria, Romania, and Serbia, which had initially started down what the West has labeled the "path of nostalgia," postcommunist rule is only now, in the late 1990s, declining. East Bloc countries closer to Europe's center—the former East Ger- many, Poland, Hungary, and the former Czechoslovakia—seem to have moved further in their Westernization efforts. But even this group is marked by major differences in the history of their transitions, in the makeup of the poUtical and business eUtes after

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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