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Perceptions of Teaching Race and Gender: Results of a Survey of Social Studies Teachers

Perceptions of Teaching Race and Gender: Results of a Survey of Social Studies Teachers <p>Abstract:</p><p>This study reports the results of a survey on teaching race and gender from a sample of high school social studies teachers (N=309) across Massachusetts. Using critical race theory mixed methods, the results showed that (1) social studies teachers reported that they were comfortable teaching about race and gender, that race and gender inequity should be addressed in the social studies classroom, and that they regularly covered race- and gender-related topics; (2) teachers at moderate-poverty schools were more likely to teach about Latina/o, Asian, Arab/Middle Eastern, and Indigenous people than teachers in low and high poverty schools; and (3) teachers responded that race and gender were not adequately covered in the curriculum and they wanted more professional development on teaching race and gender.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Perceptions of Teaching Race and Gender: Results of a Survey of Social Studies Teachers

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This study reports the results of a survey on teaching race and gender from a sample of high school social studies teachers (N=309) across Massachusetts. Using critical race theory mixed methods, the results showed that (1) social studies teachers reported that they were comfortable teaching about race and gender, that race and gender inequity should be addressed in the social studies classroom, and that they regularly covered race- and gender-related topics; (2) teachers at moderate-poverty schools were more likely to teach about Latina/o, Asian, Arab/Middle Eastern, and Indigenous people than teachers in low and high poverty schools; and (3) teachers responded that race and gender were not adequately covered in the curriculum and they wanted more professional development on teaching race and gender.</p>

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 8, 2018

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