Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Pastoral and Politics in the Old South (review)

Pastoral and Politics in the Old South (review) Pastoral and Politics in the Old South By John M. Grammer Louisiana State University Press, 1 997 185 pp. Cloth, $32.50 Reviewed by Mark Q. Malvasl, assistant professor of history at Randolph-Macon College and author of The Unregenerate South, a study of the Nashville Agrarians, from Louisiana State University Press, 1 997. Almost from the time of their first discoveries, Europeans projected images of Uberation and regeneration onto the New World. An extensive Uterature celebrated the Americas as lands free from avarice, luxury, corruption, decadence, and sinfulness. This Uterary tradition, based on a combination of bibUcal and classical sources, in time also helped Americans to envision themselves as a people unencumbered by the burdens of history that tormented a languishing Old World. Americans were new men and women. As peaceful, happy, and independent farmers, content to harvest the fruits of their own labor and to enjoy the blessings of the simple rural Ufe, they were wise innocents dweUing in an enduring earthly paradise. In Pastoral and Politics in the Old South, John M. Grammer investigates the southern version of this American pastoral saga by analyzing the representative works of five notable Virginia writers: John Taylor, John Randolph, Nadianiel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Pastoral and Politics in the Old South (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (4) – Jan 4, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/pastoral-and-politics-in-the-old-south-review-lOKsRWu0jn
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pastoral and Politics in the Old South By John M. Grammer Louisiana State University Press, 1 997 185 pp. Cloth, $32.50 Reviewed by Mark Q. Malvasl, assistant professor of history at Randolph-Macon College and author of The Unregenerate South, a study of the Nashville Agrarians, from Louisiana State University Press, 1 997. Almost from the time of their first discoveries, Europeans projected images of Uberation and regeneration onto the New World. An extensive Uterature celebrated the Americas as lands free from avarice, luxury, corruption, decadence, and sinfulness. This Uterary tradition, based on a combination of bibUcal and classical sources, in time also helped Americans to envision themselves as a people unencumbered by the burdens of history that tormented a languishing Old World. Americans were new men and women. As peaceful, happy, and independent farmers, content to harvest the fruits of their own labor and to enjoy the blessings of the simple rural Ufe, they were wise innocents dweUing in an enduring earthly paradise. In Pastoral and Politics in the Old South, John M. Grammer investigates the southern version of this American pastoral saga by analyzing the representative works of five notable Virginia writers: John Taylor, John Randolph, Nadianiel

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

There are no references for this article.