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Occupied Vicksburg by Bradley R. Clampitt (review)

Occupied Vicksburg by Bradley R. Clampitt (review) Sometimes White chooses not to probe deeply enough: How did Grant show such poor judgment in associating with Jay Gould and Jim Fisk when it came to their effort to corner the gold market? What should readers make of John Rawlins’s advocacy of Cuban independence once they learn that he possessed Cuban bonds? What exactly was Orville Babcock’s role in the Whiskey Ring? What about all those family members who sought to take advantage of being relatives of the president to advance their own inter- ests? Sometimes White describes Grant’s policies without considering the boundaries of the possible or the choices open to the eighteenth president. For example, what should readers make of Grant’s alternatives in 1875 when it came to balancing the interests of the freedpeople in Mississippi with the Republican Party’s prospects in Ohio? Often White prefers to leave certain questions open, refraining from offering his own assessment. The reader is thus left puzzled as to where the biographer stands. Although White views his subject favorably, he is willing to speculate about Grant’s shortcomings. The result is a portrait of an intensely human being that still frustrates the biographer’s efforts to unlock his deeper secrets, although White http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Occupied Vicksburg by Bradley R. Clampitt (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (2) – May 25, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Sometimes White chooses not to probe deeply enough: How did Grant show such poor judgment in associating with Jay Gould and Jim Fisk when it came to their effort to corner the gold market? What should readers make of John Rawlins’s advocacy of Cuban independence once they learn that he possessed Cuban bonds? What exactly was Orville Babcock’s role in the Whiskey Ring? What about all those family members who sought to take advantage of being relatives of the president to advance their own inter- ests? Sometimes White describes Grant’s policies without considering the boundaries of the possible or the choices open to the eighteenth president. For example, what should readers make of Grant’s alternatives in 1875 when it came to balancing the interests of the freedpeople in Mississippi with the Republican Party’s prospects in Ohio? Often White prefers to leave certain questions open, refraining from offering his own assessment. The reader is thus left puzzled as to where the biographer stands. Although White views his subject favorably, he is willing to speculate about Grant’s shortcomings. The result is a portrait of an intensely human being that still frustrates the biographer’s efforts to unlock his deeper secrets, although White

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 25, 2018

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