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Nostalgic for Utopia: Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South

Nostalgic for Utopia: Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South Essa y .................... Nostalgic for Utopia Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South by Joseph M. Thompson Romaine did not root her nostalgia in the past to evoke a simpler time of hazy, bygone days. Instead, she wanted to remind southerners of the most radical moments of their history in order to pave a way forward. Front row: Bessie Jones, Jean Ritchie, Anne Romaine, Doc Watson, Rosalie Watson; back row: three unidentified people, and Mike Seeger at far right, ca. 1960s. Photo courtesy of the Mike Seeger Collection, PF- 20009/110, Souther n Folklife Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 45 peaking in March of 1995, shortly before her death, Anne Romaine reflected on the folk music concerts to which she had devoted the past thirty years of her life. At fi thre fty-e year s old and with relatively little commercial success to show for h - er life  S time of effort, the white civil rights activist and musician still held faith in the power of music “to create unity, and to sharpen the spir- it of cour age.” In 1964, Romaine had joined the Southern Students Organizing Committee (sso http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Nostalgic for Utopia: Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South

Southern Cultures , Volume 24 (3) – Oct 11, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

Essa y .................... Nostalgic for Utopia Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South by Joseph M. Thompson Romaine did not root her nostalgia in the past to evoke a simpler time of hazy, bygone days. Instead, she wanted to remind southerners of the most radical moments of their history in order to pave a way forward. Front row: Bessie Jones, Jean Ritchie, Anne Romaine, Doc Watson, Rosalie Watson; back row: three unidentified people, and Mike Seeger at far right, ca. 1960s. Photo courtesy of the Mike Seeger Collection, PF- 20009/110, Souther n Folklife Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 45 peaking in March of 1995, shortly before her death, Anne Romaine reflected on the folk music concerts to which she had devoted the past thirty years of her life. At fi thre fty-e year s old and with relatively little commercial success to show for h - er life  S time of effort, the white civil rights activist and musician still held faith in the power of music “to create unity, and to sharpen the spir- it of cour age.” In 1964, Romaine had joined the Southern Students Organizing Committee (sso

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 11, 2018

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