New People in the New South: An Overview of Southern Immigration

New People in the New South: An Overview of Southern Immigration essay ...................... New People in the New South An Overview of Southern Immigration by Carl L. Bankston III New York, Chicago, and San Francisco are fixed in our imaginations as the great American immigrant settlements. The Immigration Station at Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. he classic, stereotypical U.S. immigrant destination is a large city in the North, Midwest, or far West. New York, Chicago, San Francisco are fixed in our imaginations as the great American immigrant settlements. Until recently, most people rarely considered the U.S. South when they thought of new arrivals from other countries. For much of American history the South had very few foreignborn people, and from 1850 to 1970, it was home to a smaller percentage of immigrants than any other region (see Figure 1). Even during the great period of migration from 1880 to 1920, a time when massive waves of newcomers arrived on American shores, only about 2.5 percent of the people in the southern states were foreign-born. After 1970, however, the proportion of southerners who were immigrants began to increase sharply. By 1990 the South had a greater percentage of immigrants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

New People in the New South: An Overview of Southern Immigration

Southern Cultures, Volume 13 (4) – Nov 14, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

essay ...................... New People in the New South An Overview of Southern Immigration by Carl L. Bankston III New York, Chicago, and San Francisco are fixed in our imaginations as the great American immigrant settlements. The Immigration Station at Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. he classic, stereotypical U.S. immigrant destination is a large city in the North, Midwest, or far West. New York, Chicago, San Francisco are fixed in our imaginations as the great American immigrant settlements. Until recently, most people rarely considered the U.S. South when they thought of new arrivals from other countries. For much of American history the South had very few foreignborn people, and from 1850 to 1970, it was home to a smaller percentage of immigrants than any other region (see Figure 1). Even during the great period of migration from 1880 to 1920, a time when massive waves of newcomers arrived on American shores, only about 2.5 percent of the people in the southern states were foreign-born. After 1970, however, the proportion of southerners who were immigrants began to increase sharply. By 1990 the South had a greater percentage of immigrants

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 14, 2007

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