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New Kids on the Block Schedule: Beginning Teachers Face Challenges

New Kids on the Block Schedule: Beginning Teachers Face Challenges Introduction and Statement of the Problem Across the United States, an ever-increasing number of high schools have reevaluated their use of instructional time and have adopted some form of a block schedule. Block sched- uling, an innovation grounded in Trump’s (1959) Flexible Modular Scheduling Design, reorganizes the school day into extended blocks of time, each approximately 70 to 90 minutes. According to proponents of the block schedule, the reorganization of instructional time into longer, more flexible “blocks” offers New Kids on the Block Schedule: possibilities to extend classroom experiences Beginning Teachers Face Challenges (Marshak, 1999), to reduce discipline problems (Hampton, 1997), to increase student atten- dance (Khazzaka, 1998) and to decrease fail- Sally J. Zepeda, Ph.D. ure rates (Hottenstein & Maletesta, 1993). R. Stewart Mayers Cawelti (1994) believes that block scheduling University of Georgia increases teacher planning time, decreases teacher load by reducing the number of stu- dents and preparations per teacher, and en- courages teachers to vary teaching strategies. Literature on the problems of beginning teachers falls into one of two categories: those that deal with problems specific to novice teachers and strategies offered to alleviate those difficulties. To date, no study specifically examining prob- lems of beginning http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

New Kids on the Block Schedule: Beginning Teachers Face Challenges

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Introduction and Statement of the Problem Across the United States, an ever-increasing number of high schools have reevaluated their use of instructional time and have adopted some form of a block schedule. Block sched- uling, an innovation grounded in Trump’s (1959) Flexible Modular Scheduling Design, reorganizes the school day into extended blocks of time, each approximately 70 to 90 minutes. According to proponents of the block schedule, the reorganization of instructional time into longer, more flexible “blocks” offers New Kids on the Block Schedule: possibilities to extend classroom experiences Beginning Teachers Face Challenges (Marshak, 1999), to reduce discipline problems (Hampton, 1997), to increase student atten- dance (Khazzaka, 1998) and to decrease fail- Sally J. Zepeda, Ph.D. ure rates (Hottenstein & Maletesta, 1993). R. Stewart Mayers Cawelti (1994) believes that block scheduling University of Georgia increases teacher planning time, decreases teacher load by reducing the number of stu- dents and preparations per teacher, and en- courages teachers to vary teaching strategies. Literature on the problems of beginning teachers falls into one of two categories: those that deal with problems specific to novice teachers and strategies offered to alleviate those difficulties. To date, no study specifically examining prob- lems of beginning

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 1, 2001

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