Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Native Ground

Native Ground Photo essay .................... photographs by Rob McDonald "Jesus," inside Andalusia, the home of Flannery O'Connor in Milledgeville, Georgia. As between clear blue and cloud, Between haystack and sunset sky, Between oak and slated roof, I had my existence. I was there. Me in place and the place in me. --Seamus Heaney, "A Herbal" For the past twenty years, I have made a career as a teacher of American literature. For the last twelve, I have worked also, with equal seriousness and passion, as a photographer. My new series, Native Ground, unites these pursuits in an exploration of the role place plays in shaping the literary imagination: the notion that writers compose out of a peculiar understanding and depth of connection to physical space, remembered or immediate. Personal and professional interests have led me to focus on writers who have lived and worked in the southern region of the United States. After all, if convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place. It seems to me that Eudora Welty is right in saying that "of all the arts, [writing] is the one least likely to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/native-ground-y5b4uM7aLH
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Photo essay .................... photographs by Rob McDonald "Jesus," inside Andalusia, the home of Flannery O'Connor in Milledgeville, Georgia. As between clear blue and cloud, Between haystack and sunset sky, Between oak and slated roof, I had my existence. I was there. Me in place and the place in me. --Seamus Heaney, "A Herbal" For the past twenty years, I have made a career as a teacher of American literature. For the last twelve, I have worked also, with equal seriousness and passion, as a photographer. My new series, Native Ground, unites these pursuits in an exploration of the role place plays in shaping the literary imagination: the notion that writers compose out of a peculiar understanding and depth of connection to physical space, remembered or immediate. Personal and professional interests have led me to focus on writers who have lived and worked in the southern region of the United States. After all, if convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place. It seems to me that Eudora Welty is right in saying that "of all the arts, [writing] is the one least likely to

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 5, 2012

There are no references for this article.