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My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South by Sergio A. Lussana (review)

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South by Sergio A.... My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South. By Sergio A. Lussana. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2016. Pp. 225. Cloth, $50.00.) Lewis Clarke famously proclaimed in 1842 that “a slave can’t be a man!” and, until recently, most scholars who commented on slave mas culinity seemed to agree. But focused studies of manhood among the ved, while still few and very recent, are challenging simplistic gener- ensla alizations that slavery was a profoundly emasculating experience and that heroic resistance was the only way for a slave to assert manliness. Fortified by the growth of masculinity studies and a growing body of research on women in slavery, historians are widening their conceptualizations of slave manhood beyond family life and violent resistance and combing the evi dence in search of male slaves’ inner and everyday lives. Bertram Wyatt- xample, attempts in an 1988 issue of the American Historical Brown, for e Review to peek behind the “mask of obedience” and sketch out a frame- work for considering male slave psychology; Edward Baptist’s essay in the anthology Southern Manhood (2004) calls attention to both caretaking and frankly antisocial behaviors among enslaved men; and, in what had been until http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South by Sergio A. Lussana (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (4) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South. By Sergio A. Lussana. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2016. Pp. 225. Cloth, $50.00.) Lewis Clarke famously proclaimed in 1842 that “a slave can’t be a man!” and, until recently, most scholars who commented on slave mas culinity seemed to agree. But focused studies of manhood among the ved, while still few and very recent, are challenging simplistic gener- ensla alizations that slavery was a profoundly emasculating experience and that heroic resistance was the only way for a slave to assert manliness. Fortified by the growth of masculinity studies and a growing body of research on women in slavery, historians are widening their conceptualizations of slave manhood beyond family life and violent resistance and combing the evi dence in search of male slaves’ inner and everyday lives. Bertram Wyatt- xample, attempts in an 1988 issue of the American Historical Brown, for e Review to peek behind the “mask of obedience” and sketch out a frame- work for considering male slave psychology; Edward Baptist’s essay in the anthology Southern Manhood (2004) calls attention to both caretaking and frankly antisocial behaviors among enslaved men; and, in what had been until

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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