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"Music With the Bark On": The Southern Journeys of John and Alan Lomax

"Music With the Bark On": The Southern Journeys of John and Alan Lomax Up Beat Down South "Music With the Bark On" The Southern Journeys ofJohn and Alan Lomax BY GAVIN JAMES CAMPBELL / was impressed again that the South was still a rich area, rich in antiquities and still producing new sounds. Whatever there remained ofcreativity in ourAmericanfolk tradition lay here, waitingfor a careless and success-mad world to notice it. --Alan Ijimax, i960 The microphone never gets the same recognition as the breakdowns, ballads, and blues that it records. Yet with it, John and Alan Lomax preserved much of the South's musical diversity and created a national audience for traditional southern music. Between them the father-son team spent over fifty years recording southerners and their music in homes, churches, and fields. They carried their microphones over back roads, down rivers, and up hills, determined to collect the music in the places where it thrived, seeking what Alan Lomax called "music with the bark on." Their single-minded determination resulted in perhaps the most above: Alan Lomax (right) with Wade Ward, 19jy. Courtesy ofRounder Records. complete sonic maps of the South ever compiled, and made the microphone one of the region's most important instruments. John A. Lomax was born in 1867 near http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"Music With the Bark On": The Southern Journeys of John and Alan Lomax

Southern Cultures , Volume 4 (3) – Jan 4, 1998

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Up Beat Down South "Music With the Bark On" The Southern Journeys ofJohn and Alan Lomax BY GAVIN JAMES CAMPBELL / was impressed again that the South was still a rich area, rich in antiquities and still producing new sounds. Whatever there remained ofcreativity in ourAmericanfolk tradition lay here, waitingfor a careless and success-mad world to notice it. --Alan Ijimax, i960 The microphone never gets the same recognition as the breakdowns, ballads, and blues that it records. Yet with it, John and Alan Lomax preserved much of the South's musical diversity and created a national audience for traditional southern music. Between them the father-son team spent over fifty years recording southerners and their music in homes, churches, and fields. They carried their microphones over back roads, down rivers, and up hills, determined to collect the music in the places where it thrived, seeking what Alan Lomax called "music with the bark on." Their single-minded determination resulted in perhaps the most above: Alan Lomax (right) with Wade Ward, 19jy. Courtesy ofRounder Records. complete sonic maps of the South ever compiled, and made the microphone one of the region's most important instruments. John A. Lomax was born in 1867 near

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1998

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