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Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America by Michael A. Schoeppner (review)

Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America by... an advocate of both the Liberty Party and immediate abolition who steered much of the lobbying work of the 1840s. Leavitt’s connections to politi- cians and his political radicalism led to colorful and vigorous debates over slavery in correspondence and the press. Harrold’s ability to tell an engag- ing story by following a single historical figure makes this chapter and the following one on Free Soil politics the most compelling of the entire book. The fifth chapter focuses mainly on the role of Lewis Tappan in shaping abolitionist politics in the era of growing divisions within the larger an- tislavery movement. The descriptions of Leavitt and Tappan are detailed and engaging, and Harrold deftly builds a clear picture of Washington politics around these two men. Overall, Stanley Harrold’s deep familiarity with the subject of antislav- ery politics and the individuals involved in debates at the national level is both a key strength and a weakness of American Abolitionism. In the chapters detailing specific campaigns and individuals, his work shines as a model of strong scholarship and engaging storytelling, but the book remains inaccessible to scholars who are not already immersed in the field of abolition or early American politics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America by Michael A. Schoeppner (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (3) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

an advocate of both the Liberty Party and immediate abolition who steered much of the lobbying work of the 1840s. Leavitt’s connections to politi- cians and his political radicalism led to colorful and vigorous debates over slavery in correspondence and the press. Harrold’s ability to tell an engag- ing story by following a single historical figure makes this chapter and the following one on Free Soil politics the most compelling of the entire book. The fifth chapter focuses mainly on the role of Lewis Tappan in shaping abolitionist politics in the era of growing divisions within the larger an- tislavery movement. The descriptions of Leavitt and Tappan are detailed and engaging, and Harrold deftly builds a clear picture of Washington politics around these two men. Overall, Stanley Harrold’s deep familiarity with the subject of antislav- ery politics and the individuals involved in debates at the national level is both a key strength and a weakness of American Abolitionism. In the chapters detailing specific campaigns and individuals, his work shines as a model of strong scholarship and engaging storytelling, but the book remains inaccessible to scholars who are not already immersed in the field of abolition or early American politics.

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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