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Molasses-Colored Glasses: WPA and Sundry Sources on Molasses and Southern Foodways

Molasses-Colored Glasses: WPA and Sundry Sources on Molasses and Southern Foodways Beyond Grits and Gravy Molasses-Colored Glasses WPA and Sundry Sources on Molasses and Southern Foodways B y F r e d e r I c k d ou g la s s o pI e After the Louisiana Purchase, sugar cultivation for national and international markets gradually became limited to Florida and Louisiana, but sugar cane was still grown for local consumption in states like Virginia and Alabama. Ashland Belle Helene Plantation (here) produced 24,000 gallons of molasses in the 1870s. Photograph courtesy of the Collections of Library of Congress. Molasses has been one of the three Ms of the diet of southern common folks, along with meat (salt pork) and meal (corn meal). It has served as a baking ingredient, condiment, and cold remedy, and it was central to special-occasion meals in the South. We can draw on a range of sources, including travelers' accounts, autobiography, community studies, Wpa narratives, and interviews conducted for the Origins of Soul Food Oral History Project to examine its importance and its changing role in southern foodways. Molasses is made from sugar cane and the similar sorghum syrup comes from sweet sorghum grass. Both crops were probably introduced to the New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Molasses-Colored Glasses: WPA and Sundry Sources on Molasses and Southern Foodways

Southern Cultures , Volume 14 (1) – Feb 13, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Beyond Grits and Gravy Molasses-Colored Glasses WPA and Sundry Sources on Molasses and Southern Foodways B y F r e d e r I c k d ou g la s s o pI e After the Louisiana Purchase, sugar cultivation for national and international markets gradually became limited to Florida and Louisiana, but sugar cane was still grown for local consumption in states like Virginia and Alabama. Ashland Belle Helene Plantation (here) produced 24,000 gallons of molasses in the 1870s. Photograph courtesy of the Collections of Library of Congress. Molasses has been one of the three Ms of the diet of southern common folks, along with meat (salt pork) and meal (corn meal). It has served as a baking ingredient, condiment, and cold remedy, and it was central to special-occasion meals in the South. We can draw on a range of sources, including travelers' accounts, autobiography, community studies, Wpa narratives, and interviews conducted for the Origins of Soul Food Oral History Project to examine its importance and its changing role in southern foodways. Molasses is made from sugar cane and the similar sorghum syrup comes from sweet sorghum grass. Both crops were probably introduced to the New

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2008

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