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Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and the Reformation of Mourning

Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and the Reformation of Mourning Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and   the Reformation of Mourning by Suzanne Penuel welfth Night  (ca.  1602)  begins  and  ends  with  referencesto     dead  fatherswhose     link  to  the  actionof     the  play  is  clearlysignific   ant  T and  significantly  unclear.A     lady  richlyleft   by     one  fatheris     eroti- cal ly  paralyzed. Anotherof     slightlylo   wer status,also   f   atherless,lea   ves  the family  home.  The  fathersrev   ealth   emselves merely  in  traces:Olivia’   s  is  mentioned  in  an  aside  telling us     thath   e  was  “a  count/     Thatdied     some  twelvemonth  since,”  and  Viola  notes  hers  just  in  passing  until act  5,  when  she  and  Sebastian  verify  each  other’s identities.One     might  as- sume   that   this  paternal a   bsence  would  free  the  plot from  being  the  sort  that jonson  crafted,with     the  olderg   enerationho   vering  over  the  libidos  of  the young.  Afteral   l,th   e  casuala   pproximation of  “some  twelvemonth  since”  suggests  the  count’s insignificance,  and  the  quantitative pla   y  on  “count”  and  “account”u   nderscores the  imprecision  of  the  dating  and  the  wealth of  the  estateleft    Olivia by  her  father.But     ratherthan     cele- brating  post-adolescentfreed   http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Philology University of North Carolina Press

Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and the Reformation of Mourning

Studies in Philology , Volume 107 (1) – Jan 13, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1543-0383

Abstract

Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and   the Reformation of Mourning by Suzanne Penuel welfth Night  (ca.  1602)  begins  and  ends  with  referencesto     dead  fatherswhose     link  to  the  actionof     the  play  is  clearlysignific   ant  T and  significantly  unclear.A     lady  richlyleft   by     one  fatheris     eroti- cal ly  paralyzed. Anotherof     slightlylo   wer status,also   f   atherless,lea   ves  the family  home.  The  fathersrev   ealth   emselves merely  in  traces:Olivia’   s  is  mentioned  in  an  aside  telling us     thath   e  was  “a  count/     Thatdied     some  twelvemonth  since,”  and  Viola  notes  hers  just  in  passing  until act  5,  when  she  and  Sebastian  verify  each  other’s identities.One     might  as- sume   that   this  paternal a   bsence  would  free  the  plot from  being  the  sort  that jonson  crafted,with     the  olderg   enerationho   vering  over  the  libidos  of  the young.  Afteral   l,th   e  casuala   pproximation of  “some  twelvemonth  since”  suggests  the  count’s insignificance,  and  the  quantitative pla   y  on  “count”  and  “account”u   nderscores the  imprecision  of  the  dating  and  the  wealth of  the  estateleft    Olivia by  her  father.But     ratherthan     cele- brating  post-adolescentfreed  

Journal

Studies in PhilologyUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 13, 2010

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