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Mill Village and The Stretch-Out

Mill Village and The Stretch-Out Mason-Dixon Lines tw o p o e m s b y ro n ra s h "But what was done was done. Before too long / the weave room jarred the hearing from my ears, / and I got used to living with a crowd." Inside a cotton textile mill, circa 1910, courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Mill Village Mill houses lined both sides of every road like boxcars on a track. They were so close a man could piss off of his own front porch, hit four houses if he had the wind. Everytime your neighbors had a fight, then made up in bed as couples do, came home drunk, played the radio, you knew, whether or not you wanted to. 85 So I bought a dimestore picture, a country scene, built a frame and nailed it on the wall, no people in it, just a lot of land, stretching out behind an empty barn. Sometimes at night if I was feeling low, I'd stuff my ears with cotton. Then I'd stare up at that picture like it was a window, and I was back home listening to the farm. But what http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Mill Village and The Stretch-Out

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (1) – May 3, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Mason-Dixon Lines tw o p o e m s b y ro n ra s h "But what was done was done. Before too long / the weave room jarred the hearing from my ears, / and I got used to living with a crowd." Inside a cotton textile mill, circa 1910, courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Mill Village Mill houses lined both sides of every road like boxcars on a track. They were so close a man could piss off of his own front porch, hit four houses if he had the wind. Everytime your neighbors had a fight, then made up in bed as couples do, came home drunk, played the radio, you knew, whether or not you wanted to. 85 So I bought a dimestore picture, a country scene, built a frame and nailed it on the wall, no people in it, just a lot of land, stretching out behind an empty barn. Sometimes at night if I was feeling low, I'd stuff my ears with cotton. Then I'd stare up at that picture like it was a window, and I was back home listening to the farm. But what

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 3, 2004

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