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Michael Palencia-Roth Answers Dorothy Figueira

Michael Palencia-Roth Answers Dorothy Figueira DF:Y ou started as a Professor of Comparative Literature and retired as a Professor of Comparative and World Literature. Do you see a seismic shift here? mPr : I remember two rather brief conversations I had with my faculty advisers at Harvard in 0.791 I had been there for about a year and was beginning to be somewhat restive about the limitations that were being imposed on me while in graduate school. By that time, I was already actively auditing three or four semi- nars and courses each semester in addition to taking the normal four seminars for credit. I was just hungry to learn, and it did not occur to me then that I was doing anything that might be considered odd or atypical. e Th se classes were in Philosophy, the Intellectual History of Europe, and Latin. My advisers then were Professors Walter Kaiser and Harry Levin, neither of whom I ever met with for more than a few minutes at a time. I had begun my graduate studies with a de- clared specialization in three literatures—English, French, and German—and in the modern period (Romanticism to the present). At the end of my r fi st year http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Michael Palencia-Roth Answers Dorothy Figueira

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

DF:Y ou started as a Professor of Comparative Literature and retired as a Professor of Comparative and World Literature. Do you see a seismic shift here? mPr : I remember two rather brief conversations I had with my faculty advisers at Harvard in 0.791 I had been there for about a year and was beginning to be somewhat restive about the limitations that were being imposed on me while in graduate school. By that time, I was already actively auditing three or four semi- nars and courses each semester in addition to taking the normal four seminars for credit. I was just hungry to learn, and it did not occur to me then that I was doing anything that might be considered odd or atypical. e Th se classes were in Philosophy, the Intellectual History of Europe, and Latin. My advisers then were Professors Walter Kaiser and Harry Levin, neither of whom I ever met with for more than a few minutes at a time. I had begun my graduate studies with a de- clared specialization in three literatures—English, French, and German—and in the modern period (Romanticism to the present). At the end of my r fi st year

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 12, 2009

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