Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Memory and the South

Memory and the South Edward L. Ayers I would like to admit right off the bat that I didn't have a thing to do with organizing this extremely well-organized conference, though I did consult on the Tshirts and mugs. I was therefore flattered when the people behind this enterprise asked me to say a few words about memory in general. The Dome Room is a good place for that, since it is testimony to the power of self-consciously shaped memory. The Rotunda and Monticello, idealized memories of a distant classical past, incongruously and somewhat improbably set down in the middle of a rustic slave state, are now what many people think of when they think of Virginia or Charlottesville. The more I looked into this memory business, the more I realized that this conference, and southern history in general, are parts of an international rethinking of the meaning of memory. The late-twentieth century brings many people to talk about memory in new ways, and there are several reasons for that. Some of those reasons have to do with the historical profession and intellectual life in general, while some of them are located in the world outside. Our sudden interest in memory has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Memory and the South

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/memory-and-the-south-Xs0n5azA6u
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Edward L. Ayers I would like to admit right off the bat that I didn't have a thing to do with organizing this extremely well-organized conference, though I did consult on the Tshirts and mugs. I was therefore flattered when the people behind this enterprise asked me to say a few words about memory in general. The Dome Room is a good place for that, since it is testimony to the power of self-consciously shaped memory. The Rotunda and Monticello, idealized memories of a distant classical past, incongruously and somewhat improbably set down in the middle of a rustic slave state, are now what many people think of when they think of Virginia or Charlottesville. The more I looked into this memory business, the more I realized that this conference, and southern history in general, are parts of an international rethinking of the meaning of memory. The late-twentieth century brings many people to talk about memory in new ways, and there are several reasons for that. Some of those reasons have to do with the historical profession and intellectual life in general, while some of them are located in the world outside. Our sudden interest in memory has

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

There are no references for this article.