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Memorious Discourse: Reprise and Representation in Postmodernism (review)

Memorious Discourse: Reprise and Representation in Postmodernism (review) she invites the reader to contemplate “a modern woman-centered reinterpretation of Romanian culture” (70). i Th s act of reinterpretation is, of course, at its very roots, iconoclastic, especially in light of nearly half a century of Communist social re- pression and cultural censorship in Eastern Europe, including Romania. Orlich’s point, and one both eloquently and convincingly made, echoes a thesis put forth by Charles Fourier in his é Th orie des quatre mouvements et des destinées généra les over two hundred years ago: “Social progress and historic changes occur by virtue of the progress of women toward liberty, and decadence of the social order occurs as the result of a decrease in the liberty of women. . . . the extension of women’s privileges is the general principle for all social progress” (1808). Articulating Gender, Narrating the Nation demonstrates how “social progress” (read: nation building) is linked with the gradual but certain emancipation of women from patriarchy. i Th s book makes a major contribution to our understanding of how women’s roles in a key transitional country, located strategically between East and West, between Asia and Europe, developed in the last century, and most important, how that process http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Memorious Discourse: Reprise and Representation in Postmodernism (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

she invites the reader to contemplate “a modern woman-centered reinterpretation of Romanian culture” (70). i Th s act of reinterpretation is, of course, at its very roots, iconoclastic, especially in light of nearly half a century of Communist social re- pression and cultural censorship in Eastern Europe, including Romania. Orlich’s point, and one both eloquently and convincingly made, echoes a thesis put forth by Charles Fourier in his é Th orie des quatre mouvements et des destinées généra les over two hundred years ago: “Social progress and historic changes occur by virtue of the progress of women toward liberty, and decadence of the social order occurs as the result of a decrease in the liberty of women. . . . the extension of women’s privileges is the general principle for all social progress” (1808). Articulating Gender, Narrating the Nation demonstrates how “social progress” (read: nation building) is linked with the gradual but certain emancipation of women from patriarchy. i Th s book makes a major contribution to our understanding of how women’s roles in a key transitional country, located strategically between East and West, between Asia and Europe, developed in the last century, and most important, how that process

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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