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Mapping the Spaces of Women's Civil War History

Mapping the Spaces of Women's Civil War History revi ew es say Mapping the Spaces of Women's Civil War History "Just as none of us is outside or beyond geography, none of us is completely free from the struggle over geography. That struggle is complex and interesting because it is not only about soldiers and cannons but also about ideas, about forms, about images and imaginings." --Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism lyde cullen sizer "History," writes historian Elsa Barkley Brown, is "everybody talking at once, multiple rhythms being played simultaneously. The events and people we write about did not occur in isolation but in dialogue with a myriad of other people and events."1 As historians, we work to isolate one thread of the conversation, she argues, but "the trick is how to put that conversation in a context," to illuminate its dialogue with others. Recent work on women during the Civil War reflects a new interest in the way multiple rhythms play simultaneously during that era, and they increasingly "put that conversation in a context." The word many historians use to describe the work they are doing is geography. Stephanie Camp, who considers the Civil War in the final chapter of Closer to Freedom, reveals a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Mapping the Spaces of Women's Civil War History

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

revi ew es say Mapping the Spaces of Women's Civil War History "Just as none of us is outside or beyond geography, none of us is completely free from the struggle over geography. That struggle is complex and interesting because it is not only about soldiers and cannons but also about ideas, about forms, about images and imaginings." --Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism lyde cullen sizer "History," writes historian Elsa Barkley Brown, is "everybody talking at once, multiple rhythms being played simultaneously. The events and people we write about did not occur in isolation but in dialogue with a myriad of other people and events."1 As historians, we work to isolate one thread of the conversation, she argues, but "the trick is how to put that conversation in a context," to illuminate its dialogue with others. Recent work on women during the Civil War reflects a new interest in the way multiple rhythms play simultaneously during that era, and they increasingly "put that conversation in a context." The word many historians use to describe the work they are doing is geography. Stephanie Camp, who considers the Civil War in the final chapter of Closer to Freedom, reveals a

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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